How many concealments???

As the Catholic Church’s Global traditions continue to be shocked’, by the revelations of Millenia of (hidden) Child Sexual Abuse & disagreements with the Scriptures that they supposedly preach: this unravelling Double Standard is rupturing far more than the “fire & brimstone” as foretold in the Hebrew & New Testament Bibles.

Following the 2013-17 Child Abuse Royal Commission, it is becoming clearer the deeper impacts of the Institutional-related Child Sexual Abuses. Another group of the schools in the GPS (Greater Public Schools) cohort, were those influenced by the Catholic Church. Despite the Imprisonment of (Cardinal) George Pell in 2017, other previous and future cases continue to ‘prune back’ this vile & inappropriate behaviour. Resulting from a reading through a Royal Commission Witness Statement from Peter Clinch, Province Leader of the Congregation of Christian Brothers.

It was during the documentation of the Public & Private frequency of the attempts at Institutions in coping with these revealed matters, that the overlapping truths of the immensely, deceptive nature’s concealed (hidden) beneath much of our social fabric. As disappointing as CSA occurring, it does give a wider understanding of the apparent ‘breeding ground’ that Brisbane’s & South East Queensland’s GPS system has demonstrated. BBC, BGS & IGS have already had multiple instances revealed. Most recently, GT, NC & TSS have been revealed.

Through this, a can-of-worms has truly been identified – which many CSA Survivours & Perpetrators have long known of. It is even now being acknowledged that rushed Court approvals are needed, to ensure that some of these elderly/terminal CSA Survivours have their Applications rushed – before they may lose their chance to enjoy spending it.

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Understanding your legal rights under the National Redress Scheme

This newsletter provides you with information about your legal options in regards to the National Redress Scheme (the Scheme).

For more information or to find support services, visit the http://nationalredress.gov.au/ or call 1800 737 377 Monday to Friday (local time) excluding public holidays.

Understanding your legal rights under the National Redress Scheme

You are not required to use a lawyer to apply for redress. However, you may wish to seek legal advice to understand if redress if the best option for you and the impact it may have on other legal rights.

If you want to access legal support, the Scheme offers free legal advice through knowmore or call 1800 605 762 (Free call).

You can also choose to use a private lawyer. This will be at your own cost. Below are some questions you may have regarding the use of lawyers and the Scheme. 

Frequently Asked Questions

 

Am I required to seek legal advice?

No. However, you may wish to seek legal advice as this may help you through the process and allow you to completely understand your legal rights.

Can I get free legal advice?

Yes. The Scheme provides free legal support services through ‘knowmore’.

What can knowmore provide?

knowmore is available for free to all people thinking about applying to the Scheme.

knowmore can provide you with:

  • legal support through the application process,
  • legal advice on your options, including the availability of other forms of action or redress aside from the Scheme,
  • assistance understanding the legal effects of accepting an offer of redress,
  • advice on the effect of confidentiality agreements in past proceedings,
  • take complaints about the Scheme,
  • support obtaining records,
  • linking with specialist counselling, support services and victims’ support groups, and
  • any other legal support needs, through providing information and referral support.

 

What is knowmore?

knowmore is a legal service funded by the Commonwealth Government through the Attorney-General’s Department.

knowmore delivers free services nationally from its three offices in Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney with regular visits to other States and Territories. These services are delivered through its multidisciplinary team of lawyers, social workers and counsellors.

knowmore has a proven track record of providing legal support services to survivors of child sexual abuse. It has the infrastructure and expertise deliver national, quality and trauma‑informed legal services.
 

Do I have to use knowmore?

No. You are not required to seek legal advice to apply to the Scheme. You can also use a private lawyer. This may be at your own cost.
 

Should I seek legal advice?

You may wish to seek legal advice, with the Scheme offering free advice through knowmore. While the Scheme is designed to be non-legalistic, some people may need help to complete their application to ensure that all the necessary information has been included. knowmore can help with this.

For many people making an application for redress will be the right thing to do. However, not everyone is eligible for redress. Some people may also want to consider if civil litigation is a better option for them.

If you have received redress under other schemes or through past actions or claims you can still apply to this Scheme; however, prior payments may be taken into account.

If you accept an offer of redress you must sign a release document. By signing this release, you will not be able to continue or to commence any civil or common law proceedings against the responsible institution or its officials. This is an important right to give up. knowmore can give you advice about the release and the legal options that you might have apart from redress.
 

Where do I get support?

Redress Support Services are available to help people understand the Scheme, provide emotional support and guide people through the application process. A list of support services is available on the website.

Those who need immediate emotional support can contact:
·         Beyond Blue 1300 224 636
·        
 Mensline 1300 78 99 78
·        
 Lifeline 13 11 14
·        
 1800 Respect 1800 737 732
·        
 Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467
·         In an emergency call Triple Zero (000)

 

Find out more

To find out more, you can call the National Redress Scheme on 1800 737 377Monday to Friday, 8am to 5pm (local time), excluding public holidays. You can also visit the website the National Redress Scheme website.


RETRIEVED eMail & https://mailchi.mp/4da97a10e5de/understanding-your-legal-rights-under-the-national-redress-scheme?e=5ccca9918d

Sudden surge in Blog visitors!

While we are quietly confident at some reasons for the sudden jump to around 600 visitors, each & everyone of you are welcome to ask any questions, post any comments & piece together how you may want your location layer out.

We are planning an update to this site, in the near future. Your rapid visit, may be the motivation needed!

The Secret Jehovah’s Witness Database of Child Molesters – The Atlantic

In what is becoming all- too-often a common thread, here’s Jehovah’s Witness (hidden) darkside:


PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEXEY SWALL

A former Jehovah’s Witness is using stolen documents to expose allegations that the religion has kept hidden for decades.

In March 1997, the Watchtower Bible and Tract Society, the nonprofit organization that oversees the Jehovah’s Witnesses, sent a letter to each of its 10,883 U.S. congregations, and to many more congregations worldwide. The organization was concerned about the legal risk posed by possible child molesters within its ranks. The letter laid out instructions on how to deal with a known predator: Write a detailed report answering 12 questions—Was this a onetime occurrence, or did the accused have a history of child molestation? How is the accused viewed within the community? Does anyone else know about the abuse?—and mail it to Watchtower’s headquarters in a special blue envelope. Keep a copy of the report in your congregation’s confidential file, the instructions continued, and do not share it with anyone.

Thus did the Jehovah’s Witnesses build what might be the world’s largest database of undocumented child molesters: at least two decades’ worth of names and addresses—likely numbering in the tens of thousands—and detailed acts of alleged abuse, most of which have never been shared with law enforcement, all scanned and searchable in a Microsoft SharePoint file. In recent decades, much of the world’s attention to allegations of abuse has focused on the Catholic Church and other religious groups. Less notice has been paid to the abuse among the Jehovah’s Witnesses, a Christian sect with more than 8.5 million members. Yet all this time, Watchtower has refused to comply with multiple court orders to release the information contained in its database and has paid millions of dollars over the years to keep it secret, even from the survivors whose stories are contained within.

That effort has been remarkably successful—until recently.

A white Priority Mail box filled with manila envelopes sits on the floor of Mark O’Donnell’s wood-paneled home office, on the outskirts of Baltimore, Maryland. Mark, 51, is the owner of an exercise-equipment repair business and a longtime Jehovah’s Witness who quietly left the religion in late 2013. Soon after, he became known to ex–Jehovah’s Witnesses as John Redwood, an activist and a blogger who reports on the various controversies, including cases of child abuse, surrounding Watchtower. (Recently, he has begun using his own name.)

When I first met Mark, in May of last year, he appeared at the front door of his modest home in the same outfit he nearly always wears: khaki cargo shorts, a short-sleeved shirt, white sneakers, and sweat socks pulled up over his calves. He invited me into his densely furnished office, where a fan barely dispelled the wafting smell of cat food. He pulled an envelope from the Priority Mail box and passed me its contents, a mixture of typed and handwritten letters discussing various sins allegedly committed by members of a Jehovah’s Witness congregation in Massachusetts. All the letters in the box had been stolen by an anonymous source inside the religion and shared with Mark. The sins described in the letters ranged from the mundane—smoking pot, marital infidelity, drunkenness—to the horrifying. Slowly, over the past couple of years, Mark has been leaking the most damning contents of the box, much of which is still secret.

Mark’s eyebrows are permanently arched, and when he makes an important point, he peers out above his rimless glasses, eyes widened, which lends him a conspiratorial air.

“Start with these,” he said.

Among the papers Mark showed me that day was a series of letters about a man from Springfield, Massachusetts, who had been disfellowshipped—a form of excommunication—three times. When the man was once again reinstated, in 2008, someone working in a division of Watchtower wrote to his congregation, noting that in 1989 he was said to have “allowed his 11-year-old stepdaughter to touch his penis … on at least two occasions.”

I was struck by the oddness of the language. It insinuated that the man had agreed to, rather than initiated, the sexual contact with his stepdaughter.                 

After I left Mark’s house, I tracked down the stepdaughter, now 40. In fact, she told me, she had been only 8 when her stepfather had molested her. “He was the adult and I was the kid, so I thought I didn’t have any choice,” she said. She was terrified, she told me. “It took me two years to go to my mom about it.”

Her mother immediately went to the congregation’s elders, who later called the girl and her stepfather in to pray with them. She remembers it as a humiliating experience.

Her stepfather was eventually disfellowshipped for instances that involved “fornication,” “drunkenness,” and “lying,” according to the letters. But according to the stepdaughter, his alleged molestation of her resulted only in his being “privately reproved,” a closed-door reprimand that is usually accompanied by a temporary loss of privileges, such as not being allowed to offer comments during Bible study or lead a prayer. The letters make no reference to police being notified; the stepdaughter said her mother was encouraged to keep the matter private, and no attempt was made to keep the stepfather away from other children. (Calls to the congregation’s Kingdom Hall—the Witness version of a church—for comment went unanswered.)

By the time the letters were written, the man was attending a different congregation and had married another woman with children; he is still part of that family today. Near the end of the final letter in Mark’s possession is a question: “Is there any responsibility on the part of either body of elders … to inform his current wife of his past history of child molestation?”

Mark O’Donnell’s childhood was an isolated one. His parents, Jerry and Susan, had started attending Jehovah’s Witness meetings in the mid-1960s. Another couple from Baltimore had told them of Watchtower’s prediction that the world would end in 1975, bringing death to all non-Witnesses and transforming Earth into a paradise for the faithful. In 1968, just after Mark was born, Jerry and Susan were group-baptized in a swimming pool in Washington, D.C. Mark was an only child, and he inherited his father’s peculiar love of record-keeping. Mark would show up to meetings at the Kingdom Hall with a briefcase full of religious texts.

As in any religion, there’s some variation among Jehovah’s Witnesses in how strictly they interpret the teachings that govern their faith; Mark’s upbringing seems to have been especially stringent. As a child, he attended at least five meetings a week, plus several hours of private Bible study. On Saturday mornings, he joined his parents in “field service,” knocking on doors in search of converts. He was taught that most people outside the organization were corrupted by Satan and, given the chance, would try to steal from him, drug him, or rape him. Mainstream books and magazines were considered the work of Satan. If he broke any of the religion’s main rules, he could be disfellowshipped, meaning even his own family would have to shun him.

Throughout Mark’s childhood, he heard elders cite Proverbs 13:24: “Whoever holds back his rod hates his son.” Mark’s parents took the lesson to heart and beat him frequently. The religion forbids celebrating birthdays, voting, serving in the military, and accepting blood transfusions, even in life-and-death situations. Witnesses were encouraged to devote themselves to bringing more converts into the religion before the end of the world arrived. “Reports are heard of brothers selling their homes and property” to spend their last days proselytizing, said a Watchtower publication in 1974. “Certainly this is a fine way to spend the short time remaining before the wicked world’s end.” Some Witnesses stopped going to the doctor, quit their jobs, or ran up debt.

But piety, Mark noticed, did not always translate to morality. When he was 12, Mark became suspicious of a local Witness named Louis Ongsingco, a flight attendant who would bring home Toblerone bars for the local Witness kids and invite them to his apartment to act out religious plays. Mark noticed Ongsingco touching young girls in a way that made him uncomfortable. He told an elder about his concerns. But rather than take action against Ongsingco, the elder told him what Mark had said. Days later, Ongsingco pulled Mark aside and scolded him.

Mark’s instincts seem to have been right. In 2001, one of Mark’s childhood friends, Erin Michelle Shifflett, along with four other women, sued Ongsingco for sexual assault. The cases were settled out of court for an undisclosed sum. Ongsingco died in 2016.

To Mark, the lesson was that for all the emphasis the elders placed on moral purity, there was no greater sin than speaking out against other Witnesses.

By the time Mark was in high school, in the early 1980s, 1975 had come and gone, but Watchtower had a new prediction for the apocalypse. It said that the world would end before the passing of the generation that was alive in 1914. At the time, the youngest members of that generation were 70, so the new prediction created a sense of urgency.

“My parents basically told me, ‘You’re not even going to live to graduate from college,’” Mark said. At 17, despite having a year of college credit and a guidance counselor imploring him to apply, he decided to settle for a high-school diploma. He was baptized and later started his exercise-equipment repair company. The business provided enough flexibility for him to perform 50 hours of field service for the Witnesses a month, which qualified him for the rank of auxiliary pioneer.

Though many Witnesses left the religion after 1975, membership was on the upswing by the 1990s, and the organization was building new Kingdom Halls. Mark was installing a sound system in a new hall in Baltimore in the fall of 1997 when a young woman named Kimmy Weber asked to borrow his ladder.

At 20, Kimmy was putting in more than 90 hours of field service a month, making her a full-fledged pioneer. She had completed a two-year program at a community college on a scholarship, and would later get permission from the local elders to get her bachelor’s degree. Mark was drawn to her drive and intensity. He tracked down her email address; they flirted over AOL Instant Messenger and were married within eight months. They wanted to start a family, but decided to wait until after the arrival of paradise on Earth, when they, and their children, would be perfect. In the meantime, Kimmy began opening their home to abused and abandoned cats.

As Mark’s business grew, he brought on employees, mostly other Witnesses. When he and Kimmy had saved enough money to buy the house across the street as a rental property, they filled its three units with other Witnesses. There were ski vacations, softball games, dinner parties, and game nights—always with friends who shared their faith.

But as much as Mark enjoyed his friends’ company, he started to chafe at the insularity of their social life. It felt less like intimacy and more like a self-imposed bubble. These frustrations eventually grew into suspicions about Watchtower itself. He’d heard rumors that the organization was covering up cases of pedophilia and child abuse. But Watchtower always dismissed such criticism as “apostate-driven lies.”

A few years after he and Kimmy married, he saw a protester outside a Witness convention holding a sign that read a jw elder molested me. “I looked at that sign,” Mark told me, “and I locked it in my brain. I’ll never forget it. I said to myself, There’s no way he’s lying. Nobody would stand out there and hold a sign that says an elder molested me unless it really happened. No way. He’s telling the truth.

Watchtower adjusted its estimates for the apocalypse several more times. In 2010, it introduced the Overlapping Generations theory, which claims that the end will come before the death of everyone who was alive at the same time as anyone who was alive in 1914. Mark found these revised predictions difficult to accept.

In late 2013, Mark had an extreme reaction to an antibiotic and was confined to his couch for several weeks, away from the meetings and Bible studies. Left alone with his thoughts, he began to admit to himself that he no longer believed Armageddon was imminent. The Jehovah’s Witnesses he knew were no more deserving of God’s mercy than the nonbelievers he’d met. And here he was, 45 years old and facing a health crisis. How much more of his life was he willing to waste inside the bubble?

That November, as he and Kimmy were preparing to spend the weekend at a friend’s house, Mark suddenly stopped packing and told Kimmy he couldn’t maintain the facade anymore. He never attended another meeting.

/ . . . Continued . . . /

RETRIEVED https://www.theatlantic.com/family/archive/2019/03/the-secret-jehovahs-witness-database-of-child-molesters/584311/

RCbbc Blog eNews – prelaunch!

With the anticipation, similar to days before birth of a first child, another form of publication will soon be released. From our smaller presence in earlier days of the 5 yr Child Abuse Royal Commission (CARC), the need to ‘join the dots’ began to call out. Hopefully, with the increased-global visitors of our RCbbc Blog, we’re now able to Share another media: Newsletters! eNews are becoming a greater extension of the 247 work-cycle, allowing wider varieties of audio, visual, text & combinations of media to be exchanged. A business plan is still being developed, yet many feel that these swapping of ideas is helpful.

Latest institutions to join the National Redress Scheme

Latest institutions to join the National Redress SchemeThis newsletter includes an update on the latest institutions to join the National Redress Scheme.
For more information or to find support services, go to the National Redress Scheme website or call 1800 737 377 Monday to Friday, 8am to 5pm (local time), excluding public holidays.
 

Institution update

On 29 March 2019, the National Redress Scheme (Scheme) added over 7,000 site records to the National Redress Scheme search database. This is the largest upload to the Scheme website to date.
The following institutions have undertaken the steps to join, they are:
·         Uniting Church in Australia Assembly
·         Baptist Care NSW & ACT
·         Baptist Care SA
·         Baptist Care WA
·         Baptist Churches of New South Wales & ACT
·         Baptist Churches of Victoria
·         Sisters of Mercy Parramatta
·         Scouts Queensland

The fourth group of Anglican organisations have joined represented by Anglican Representative Limited, they are:

·         Anglican Diocese Bunbury
·         Anglican Diocese of Gippsland
·         Anglican Diocese of Grafton
·         Anglican Diocese of Melbourne
·         Anglican Diocese of Newcastle
·         Anglican Diocese of North Queensland
·         Anglican Diocese of Sydney
·         Anglican Diocese of Tasmania
·         Anglican Diocese of Willochra
·         Anglican Schools Corporation
·         Anglicare N.T. Ltd
·         Anglicare SA Ltd
·         Brotherhood of St Laurence
·         Church Missionary Society – Australia Limited
·         Church Missionary Society – NSW and ACT Limited
·         Church Missionary Society Victoria Incorporated
·         Mentone Grammar School
·         St Columba Anglican School Council
·         St Michael’s Collegiate School
·         The Council of Macarthur Anglican School, ATF Macarthur School
·         The Council of Tara Anglican School for Girls
·         The Hutchins School

For more information about which sites are covered by these institutions, go to the Scheme’s website. There is also a full list of institutions that have joined the Scheme at: www.nationalredress.gov.au/institutions/joined-scheme.

An interactive map is also now available on this website for users to choose a state or territory from the map, to find out what institutions have joined in your area.
 

Where do I get support?

Redress Support Services are available to help people understand the Scheme, provide emotional support and guide people through the application process. A list of support services is available on the website.

Those who need immediate emotional support can contact:

·         Beyond Blue 1300 224 636
·         Lifeline 13 11 14
·         1800 Respect 1800 737 732
·         Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467
·         Mensline 1300 78 99 78
·         In an emergency call Triple Zero (000)
 

Find out more

To find out more, you can call the National Redress Scheme on 1800 737 377Monday to Friday, 8am to 5pm (local time), excluding public holidays. You can also visit the website at www.nationalredress.gov.au.

Retrieved from eMail sent on 1 April 2019.

Church-hopping and School-swapping

Although Australia’s 2013-17 Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse didn’t result in many instant actions, it has begun longterm changes. Depending on how confident families are on their own decisions, many church-dependence relationships have been reassessed. Catholic Cardinal George Pell’s ‘fall from grace’ (Court Imprisonment and 4Corners ‘Guilty’) is making huge impact globally.

Gone (it would seem) is much of the previous basis for ‘trust’ in the phony and double-sided preachings of church preaching. Ironically, many Private Schools share a similar defensive nature to that of church legality, often spending more on legal Defense and Private Settlements, than having actual truths publicly revealed.

Church-hopping and School-swapping are so absurd, that they should not still be happening in broad sight. Yet, unfortunately they are. This is where our RCbbc blog can team-up with other Old-Boys/past Students-Families to help you deal with these hidden facts.