Entering InvasionDay-AustraliaDay + everything in-between

Stop Racism Now

Already (midday Fri 25.01.20), there’s an expected amount of Visitors compared to all of last wk. Coupled with the delicate tensions of our growing amount of CSA viewers, this annual event is carrying greater strain through our Aboriginal Indigenous Communities, and the publicised split of the British Royal Family – Meghan-Prince Harry situation. #megxit #InvasionDay #AustraliaDay

Australia Day or Invasion Day?

Following our recent sharing of info on the targeting of lowSES Enrolments, relevant trends of International ESL (English as Second Language) Students is also planned to be Shared. During searching + conversations, this seems to be largely unearthed Issue. Extensive information is available, due to the immense School, Education + Government worth; yet the negative outcomes have typically been overlooked.

Outside BBQ at daytime dining for Rudd House Boarders

Not anymore. As will be other overlooked, or unaddressed issues of Indigenous, rural + remote Enrolments (remember Rudd House Borders 🎯 ?).

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Vigilance Part 2 – Emotional Abuse


Frightened child, Author Jean-Francois Gornet, Paris, Source Selfie Velib, Originally Posted to Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0 Generic)

Emotional abuse is an underrated form of abuse, but no less damaging for that.

The warning signs of emotional abuse include the following [1]:

  • A child who exhibits a lack of attachment to the parent.
  • A child who is delayed in physical or emotional development, unrelated to an identifiable medical or psychological condition.
  • A child who is either inappropriately adult (parenting other children) or inappropriately infantile (constantly rocking or head-banging, for example).
  • A child who exhibits behavioral extremes (acute passivity or serious aggression; demanding behavior or abject compliance).
  • A child who attempts suicide.

The parent who rejects his/her child will constantly blame, belittle, or berate that child.  The parent unconcerned about his/her child’s well-being may refuse offers of help for that child’s school problems.

On the other hand, a parent can be so self-involved that his/her child becomes little more than a pawn for manipulation.

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[1]  Prevent Child Abuse America, “Recognizing Child Abuse:  What Parents Should Know”,   https://preventchildabuse.org/resource/recognizing-child-abuse-what-parents-should-know/.

This series will continue next week with Part 3 – Physical Abuse

RETRIEVED https://avoicereclaimed.com/2020/01/12/vigilance-part-2-emotional-abuse/

Elites as Pedophiles

If ‘the “elite” take care of their own’ and “Their need for privacy …” remind anyone of their time at BBC, these were taken from a recent article on Epstein, Royal Family and Prince Andrew. Don’t worry, they were only seen as misdemeanours, or minor sins. Obviously, the CSA Predators amongst BBC’s staff were completely different from the parental elite. Just as reputations of Private Institutions spending high funds, in attempts to silence truths from wider release was completely different from Britain’s Royal Family. Unfortunately, Kim (‘Butch’) Buchanan often referred to “those Britt’s” in his ‘Predatory’ behaviour (Similar to his reuse of a SYDNEY Batman episode).

Prince Charles and Sir James Saville

2020 is opening, with deeper CSA Similarities and Differences.

Will BBC/GPS get its own pie:
PIE, the Pedophile Information Exchange?

Retrieved: https://frankreport.com/2019/08/13/when-british-royals-are-pedophiles-its-called-peccadilloes/
Continue reading

Qld + Catholic CSA Contacts …

Queensland Police Service

Policelink 131 444

policelink@police.qld.gov.au

Crime Stoppers 1800 333 000

Safeguarding & Professional Standards Service (Archdiocese of Brisbane) 07 3324 3324

safeguarding@bne.catholic.net.au

StopLine – External Whistleblower Service (Archdiocese of Brisbane) 1300 304 550

AOB@stopline.com.au

Professional Standards Office (Catholic Church) Queensland 1800 337 928

psoqld@catholic.net.au

Perpetrators in hunting ground … ?!

As to the rites of any Student, the following copies were taken of some of BBC’s Predators: (Buchanan (Butch) & Dutton to be added; BBC Portal 1990)

Michael Golding, Music

Murre-Alan, Music

Kasurs child sex abuse victims struggle to rebuild their lives

Sound familiar? Great to read on of another’s coping with CSA!



HUSSAIN WALA: “I don’t regret speaking out, but since then, people have looked at me with strange eyes,” laments a 16-year-old Ahmed*.

He was one of 20 children sexually abused by a gang who sold videos of the acts and used them for blackmail purposes.

The police, who had conspicuously failed to act despite pleas from some parents, eventually arrested 37 men after clashes between relatives and authorities brought the issue into the media spotlight last summer, years after the abuse began.

Six months after one of the country’s biggest paedophilia abuse case broke, police now confirm 17 of the accused remain in prison awaiting trial, while three more are out on bail.

Read: Kasur child molestation case baseless, says inquiry report

This photograph taken on November 20, 2015, shows Hussain Khan Wala village in Punjab province, the scene of one of Pakistan’s worst child abuse cases. — AFP

But the young victims who defied taboos to seek justice say they have little hope for rebuilding their lives.

In recent years, more and more families in Pakistan have dared to speak out against sexual abuse of their children.

But the fight against predators remains in its infancy. 

Powerful taboos, gaps in legislation and a lack of awareness continue to fuel a phenomenon that remains hidden, yet deeply embedded within society.

Media glare

Ahmed drags his feet listlessly in the narrow winding streets of Hussain Khan Wala, a large village in rural Punjab. 

Like the other abused teens, he feels stigmatised and without any kind of support after five years of abuse.

“I feel terrible when my friends stare at me. I know what they are thinking,” he mutters. “My classmates and teachers look down on me, so I stopped going to school.”

Also read: Kasur sex abuse ─ ‘I thought of killing myself everyday’

Though the case finally made it to the national news media in July, the local police were found to have turned a blind eye to the crimes for several months “which amounts not only to criminal negligence, rather it was connivance”, according to a report by the National Commission for Human Rights.

Several of the accused belong to locally influential families.

It took a series of clashes between the victims’ families and police, in which dozens were injured, for politicians to act and demand arrests.

The families and victims were then served up to the media, with some local leaders placing the number of abused children at 280 — though that figure is believed to have been inflated as a result of attempts to leverage the tragedy for business and political gain.

Explore: Kasur child abuse case ‘not organised crime’

Authorities established that 20 youths were raped and sodomised, the only two sex crimes recognised under Pakistani law.

The country’s penal code does not prohibit sexual abuse that does not involve penetration, nor child pornography.

“This case shows there are no institutional structures to tackle sexual abuse or to protect children,” says Valerie Khan, the director of Group Development Pakistan, a local NGO which advocates legal reforms.

A law criminalising sexual abuse of children is currently being debated by Pakistan’s Senate.

These reforms are all the more urgent given the growing number of cases being reported, according to child rights’ group Sahil, which records statistics based on press reports in the absence of official data.

The group recorded fewer than 2,000 cases in 2008, but more than 3,500 in 2014, a rise it said “reflects an increase in social awareness of the problem”.

Post-Kasur: This project helps people break silence over child sexual abuse

Veteran human rights activist Hina Jilani said that while increased reporting was welcome, cases must be handled sensitively — noting that activists, judges and police were not trained in how to question child victims.

Another obstacle to greater reporting of crimes are the families themselves, who are often reluctant to intervene when they feel their “honour” is at stake, according to Jilani.

‘They should be sent away’

Eighteen-year-old Sara* says it was unreported childhood abuse, and the subsequent loss of her honour that drove her toward prostitution.

Forced to abandon her studies to work following the death of her father at the age of 16, she found herself at the mercy of an employer who she says raped her.

“If I would tell my family, they would not go to the police station,” says the frail young woman, because of the shame it would bring.

Read: Accused says children abused in his presence

It was difficult for her to make her complaint herself because “there (are) no lady police” at the station, she said, and she quit her job fearing more attacks.

Having lost her sense of worth, she turned to an intermediary at a beauty salon who guided her toward prostitution, which she now uses to support her family.

Wearing light make-up and modern but modest clothing, she has all the airs of a carefree high-schooler — apart from the fact she walks the streets alone at night.

Back in Hussain Khan Wala, the parents of abused children are waiting for the government to help them rebuild their lives anew elsewhere.

Hasan*, a labourer whose 17 year old son was among those abused, said “(They) should be sent to Islamabad or abroad because they can not study here, you must remove them from the atmosphere.”

─ *Names have been changed to protect identities of victims.

RETRIEVED https://www.dawn.com/news/1233985

RCbbc Blog eNews – prelaunch!

With the anticipation, similar to days before birth of a first child, another form of publication will soon be released. From our smaller presence in earlier days of the 5 yr Child Abuse Royal Commission (CARC), the need to ‘join the dots’ began to call out. Hopefully, with the increased-global visitors of our RCbbc Blog, we’re now able to Share another media: Newsletters! eNews are becoming a greater extension of the 247 work-cycle, allowing wider varieties of audio, visual, text & combinations of media to be exchanged. A business plan is still being developed, yet many feel that these swapping of ideas is helpful.

The Mental Health Disorder Caused By Incest And Child Abuse

It’s the disorder that robs people of their ability to feel whole.

When it comes to the disorder that can splinter people into discrete and fractious personalities, it’s important to note that this complex disorder is not uncommon.

Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID), formerly known as Multiple Personality Disorder, is often misdiagnosed. For the sufferer, the experience can be deeply confusing, with a distorted sense of self and long periods of time lost to dissociation.

Caused by childhood abuse, incest and neglect, the disorder often develops as a coping mechanism. It allows young kids to compartmentalize abuse so they can survive when caregivers or family members make them feel unsafe.

DID is described as a complex form of post-traumatic stress and dissociation, which causes a discontinuity in one’s self of self.

Professor Warwick Middleton is a leader in research and treatment on the disorder and has been working in the field for decades. Speaking to News.com.au, he recalls first writing a paper on the condition in 1991.

DID can be categorized as a developmental disorder, where a person’s personality fails to integrate as they develop.

It’s defined as an “identity disruption” and you may know it as “multiple personality disorder.” In some cultures, it may be identified as spiritual or demonic possession.

How do you identify dissociative identity disorder?

They have symptoms that you might have seen depicted in movies like “Sybil” or TV shows like “The United States of Tara.”

Sufferers of the disorder have a complex system of dissociation, which Middleton describes as “splitting off at different times into different identity states.”

“The individual might experience this as internal or external voices, which may argue and which may be associated with particular behaviors. Alternative handwritings. A whole spectrum of things,” he said.

What Middleton describes is a form of dissociation where the sufferer splits off into what appears to be a completely different “personalities.” Sufferers usually have at least two distinct personalities at some point in their life, some may have many more.

Middleton says that the majority of sufferers also fulfill criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder, major depression and somatization, while many of them have eating disorders and social phobias.

“Typically they present in their thirties, having bounced around the system for quite a while,” he said. “Because they hear voices … they’re given antipsychotics. From our research, about 20 percent of them are diagnosed with bipolar disorder.”

“If you look a bit closer they don’t have bipolar. That was just someone identifying them switching between different personality states.”

Losing large periods of your life

People who suffer from DID often have trouble remembering things.

In the autobiographical memory of their life, there are gaps where they have no recollection of what happened or what they did — and not in a regularly reported way, like when you drive home and arrive at your door with little recall of your journey.

It’s about losing big parts of your life to your other “personalities” who take over, commandeering your consciousness. While it might sound like the stuff of movies, the disorder is very real.

From Middleton’s research, he suggests it occurs in about 1.1 percent of the adult population. He describes this as being a “relatively common” condition.

What are people with DID like?

“(People with DID) range in a spectrum — (there) are people who sort of live on the fringes of existence who are chronically mentally ill, bouncing around services to people who are very high achieving, who may work in mental health services themselves.”

Sufferers often report weeks or months of their life passing by them where they have no memory and feel no agency over what transpired in that period.”

In the early nineties, the disorder was not often diagnosed and hardly at all identified by mental health professionals. These days it is much more commonly diagnosed.

Treatment for the disorder

Middleton says his interest in the disorder developed because there was “very little clinical awareness” and it wasn’t a diagnosis routinely made.

The other problem was that the issue of family assault and “incest” wasn’t properly acknowledged within Australia, where he is based, at the time.

“We now know that incest is, unfortunately, very common,” Middleton said.

“Basically in every country in the world where systematic research is done into childhood trauma and the presence of dissociative disorders we get very similar patterns.”

He said with standard treatment like cognitive behavioral therapy, the outcomes are very poor for sufferers of this disorder.

Treatment options with good outcomes include phase-orientated treatment.

Middleton was the first person, along with his colleague Dr. Jeremy Butts to publish research linking childhood trauma with the presence of DID. This paper was published over 20 years ago in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry.

He’s been a long-term director of the Society for Trauma and Dissociation.

Their findings showed that across the world, almost all sufferers of DID had, during childhood, suffered from some form of abuse, be it physical, sexual or neglect.

For more information on CPTSD and other issues visit our YouTube Channel

If you need support or would like to connect with like-minded people join our Private and Closed online Facebook Group for Child Abuse Survivors and those with CPTSD. Click here to join

The Memoir You Will Bear Witness is available on Amazon in Kindle and Paperback

Retrieved https://youwillbearwitness.com/2019/04/09/the-mental-health-disorder-caused-by-incest-and-child-abuse-2/

Returning to Toxic Relationships-part-1

Almost all of us have, at some time or other, run into an old flame and felt the desire to reconnect.  What draws us is a mix of nostalgia and the desire to correct past mistakes, to “get it right” this time.

The problem is that many of the former relationships to which we find ourselves drawn as abuse survivors were, to put it mildly, toxic.

Why do we save the love letters of a man who repeatedly cheated on us?  Why are we tempted to call the boyfriend who stole our charge cards and emptied our bank account?  Why do we find ourselves checking Facebook for the ex who put us in the emergency room?

The answer is not that time heals all wounds.  It is not that we are seeking closure, that we enjoy pain…or that we are simply too dim to know better.

One reason is familiarity.  There is something powerfully familiar about these toxic relationships.  They evoke buried memories from our past, memories we once associated with love.

Such memories are not generally in the forefront of our consciousness.  But a woman whose father was sharp and impatient with her as a child is likely to choose a partner with the same shortcomings.  A man whose mother was elusive and unresponsive is likely to find women with those qualities attractive.

The more closely an adult relationship mirrors the abuse we experienced in childhood, the more emotional power that relationship will hold for us.  And the more appealing that partner will seem.  It is as if we are wrestling with an irresistible force.

That force is not, however, love.

This series will continue next week.

FOR MORE OF MY ARTICLES ON POVERTY, POLITICS, AND MATTERS OF CONSCIENCE CHECK OUT MY BLOG A LAWYER’S PRAYERS AT: https://alawyersprayers.com

Retreieved: https://avoicereclaimed.com/2019/02/24/returning-to-toxic-relationships-part-1/

Parents who ‘brainwashed’ their three children to hide years of horrific abuse face jail | Daily Mail Online

A Chorley, Lancashire, couple hid their crimes for years by lying to social services and ‘brainwashing’ their children into believing their sadistic punishments were ‘horseplay’.
— Read on www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2244335/Parents-brainwashed-children-hide-years-horrific-abuse-face-jail.html