Paedophile Frank Valentine should never have been allowed near children

Frank Valentine was a long-serving officer of the old Child Welfare Department. He joined the public service back in the days when training was done ‘on the job’. A university degree was not needed. So Valentine learned his craft from all the drop-outs, perverts and sadists who had inhabited Child Welfare for decades.

It was a time when children were not believed. And dobbing-in a colleague was frowned upon. This was especially true about ‘unwanted’ children in State care; they were considered to be the product of inept parents, who had to be contained in institutions lest they infect polite society with the rebelliousness and bad attitudes they had learned from years of poor breeding.

Valentine was dogged with serious complaints throughout his career. But he dodged the bullet every time. Everything from a Public Service Board disciplinary hearing to criminal charges. He walked away from it all. There were no criminal convictions. ‘Lady Luck’ seemed to be on his side. He must have felt invincible.

And most of all, Valentine always denied the accusations.

He still does.

But his luck ran out this year, 2019. He was convicted of raping multiple victims when they were children placed in his care. Boys and girls. He convinced his wife and his grown children he was innocent. He sold the family home to pay for his legal fees. Over fifty witnesses spoke to the police. But no matter how many complaints there were, Valentine stood his ground. He refused to give up his dark secret. He and his family have chosen to live in denial of the truth.

Justice Nicole Noman saw right through him. She sentenced him to 22 years and 3 months in jail. He will serve at least 13 years. But that’s unlikely as he is old and sick. It seems he will die in jail. His doctors give him just over a year to live.

Frank Valentine has ruined the lives of scores of people. He has destroyed his wife’s life and the lives of his children and grandchildren. His children will have no inheritance. The disgrace and stigma of being a convicted paedophile will attach to his widow and their children and his future generations, like a long dark shadow. There will be no escaping that in the age of the internet. There is nowhere to hide.

But are there more victims out there? Are there people who haven’t spoken up?

Valentine’s former work colleague Max Morrisey spoke to the Newcastle Herald and said this…

“I have no doubt there are other victims out there. I would say to them, now that it’s known Frank was a sexual predator, seek help. It’s not too late to be able to be more at peace about what happened.”

Victims need to come forward. It’s the right thing to do. It’s safe and it’s time to heal. Don’t let this man live rent-free in your heads any longer.

We know there are more victims from Valentine’s stint at Daruk. That institution was featured this year on 60 Minutes.

Valentine was sent to Daruk by the Public Service Board disciplinary committee – a place where young boys were physically and sexually abused so frequently the local hospital helped cover up the visits from the children – it was a final chance for Valentine to straighten up his act.

But that was never going to happen.

Daruk would’ve been like a smorgasbord for a sexual predator with evil running through his veins.

After Daruk he went to Wagga Wagga to case-manage State Wards. There he took a young ward, Steve Sibraa into his home against all the rules. He molested him. Steve went to the police and Valentine copped his first criminal prosecution. But he was acquitted in 1986 back in the day when children in care were not believed against the word of a Child Welfare officer.

Valentine not only kept his job but he was ultimately promoted to second in charge of the Hunter Region despite his history of serious institutional child abuse allegations.

The complaints followed him to Yawarra Training School in Kurri Kurri -there it was alleged he sexually abused 15-year-old detainee Jeffrey Dean Smith. Valentine was charged for the second time. But the charges had to be dropped when young Jeffrey took his own life on Father’s Day in 1988, just days before the trial started. Valentine returned to his senior position with the Department and got on with his life.

Over the years many children tried to speak out against him.

They were beaten and threatened for their efforts.
So systemic was the breaking down of these victims that many will struggle coming to terms with what happened.

Some will blame themselves. As a victim myself, I am telling you – it is not your fault that you were abused.

This man was evil. And he has been able to get away with it till now.

The game-changer for Valentine was Justice Peter McClellan’s Child Abuse Royal Commission.

In 2014 he failed to show up on subpoena at the Royal Commission hearing in 2014 claiming poor health. He sent a barrister to badger and cross-examine his victims, alleging they were mistaken and had named the wrong man. His barrister told the Royal Commission he was a whistle-blower who had the children’s interests at heart. There were audible gasps in the hearing room.

Justice McClellan referred Valentine to NSW Police for full investigation. The rest is history.

If you were abused while in an institution, the time to come forward is now. We will be with you every step of the way. Don’t hang onto this any longer. Talk to me about it.

Get in touch with the team at Kelso Lawyers today – we’d like to hear from you.

Image source: Daily Telegraph

Reference: https://kelsolawyers.com/au/resources/

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RCbbc Blog eNews – prelaunch!

With the anticipation, similar to days before birth of a first child, another form of publication will soon be released. From our smaller presence in earlier days of the 5 yr Child Abuse Royal Commission (CARC), the need to ‘join the dots’ began to call out. Hopefully, with the increased-global visitors of our RCbbc Blog, we’re now able to Share another media: Newsletters! eNews are becoming a greater extension of the 247 work-cycle, allowing wider varieties of audio, visual, text & combinations of media to be exchanged. A business plan is still being developed, yet many feel that these swapping of ideas is helpful.

George Pell’s ripple effect

Driven by the realisations of the Catholic Church’s mischievous use of their “crimen sollicitationis“, Australian Cardinal Pell’s guilt to multiple charges of Child Sexual Abuse is having an immense impact. Beyond solely Catholic Churches, Religions in general hid behind the veil of ‘blessed impunity’. This has now been ripped away, in both recorded phallacies of Pell’s innocence and Charges through a Court system.

Potiphar’s Wife | The Vatican’s Secret and Child Sexual Abuse

Overview – Potiphar’s Wife by Kieran Tapsell
English summary: The cover-up of child sexual abuse by the Catholic Church has been occurring under the pontificate of six popes since 1922. For 1500 years, the Catholic Church accepted that clergy who sexually abused children deserved to be stripped of their status as priests and then imprisoned. A series of papal and Council decrees from the twelfth century required such priests to be dismissed from the priesthood, and then handed over to the civil authorities for further punishment. That all changed in 1922 when Pope Pius XI issued his decree Crimen Sollicitationis that created a de facto privilege of clergy by imposing the secret of the Holy Office on all information obtained through the Churchs canonical investigations. If the State did not know about these crimes, then there would be no State trials, and the matter could be treated as a purely canonical crime to be dealt with in secret in the Church courts. Pope Pius XII continued the decree. Pope John XXIII reissued it in 1962. Pope Paul VI in 1974 extended the reach of pontifical secrecy to the allegation itself. Pope John Paul II confirmed the application of pontifical secrecy in 2001, and in 2010, Benedict XVI even extended it to allegations about priests sexually abusing intellectually disabled adults. In 2010, Pope Benedict gave a dispensation to pontifical secrecy to allow reporting to the police where the local civil law required it, that is, just enough to keep bishops out of jail. Most countries in the world do not have any such reporting laws for the vast majority of complaints about the sexual abuse of children. Pontifical secrecy, the cornerstone of the cover up continues. The effect on the lives of children by the imposition of the Churchs Top Secret classification on clergy sex abuse allegations may not have been so bad if canon law had a decent disciplinary system to dismiss these priests. The 1983 Code of Canon Law imposed a five year limitation period which virtually ensured there would be no canonical trials. It required bishops to try to reform these priests before putting them on trial. When they were on trial, the priest could plead the Vatican Catch 22 defencehe should not be dismissed because he couldnt control himself. The Church claims that all of this has changed. Very little has changed. It has fiddled around the edges of pontifical secrecy and the disciplinary canons. The Church has been moonwalking.

Reviews & Feedback given, will also be published here.

Suspicion becoming FACT

Although mainstream media promote most NEWS releases, with ‘surprise-denial-regret’, any acknowledgement of Child Sexual Abuse is taken with expectations by CSA Survivours & those who work in the field. Even the Catholic Church’s Hierarchy are now admitting there is a problem, which needs to be solved.

More & more CSA Survivours are being brought to awareness that those close to them may not change their POV, yet with the gradual International flow, parallel with MeToo Movements Equality may be coming more into balance(?). Alike earlier ‘pendulum’ posts, preparation for counter-swings to Racism-Sexism-Instabilities will always occur. Staying connected, with those who truly know, understand & share with you is most important.

Long term effects of child sexual abuse (2)

Early Research

The manner in which the long-term effects of child sexual abuse have come to be conceptualised reflects, in no small measure, the very particular circumstances that surrounded the revelation of child sexual abuse as an all too common event in the lives of our children. The first phase of modern research into child sexual abuse was not triggered by observations on child victims, but by the self-disclosures of adults who had the courage to publicly give witness to their abuse as children. These early self-revealed victims, exclusively women, had often been the victims of incestuous abuse of the grossest kind, and plausibly attributed many of their current personal difficulties to their sexual abuse as children. This contrasts with the emergence of child abuse as a public health and research issue that has been driven by the observations of professionals caring for abused children.

Implications

The way child sexual abuse was placed on the public and health agendas put a stronger emphasis on the adult consequences of abuse than on the immediate implications for an abused child. It also emphasised the psychiatric implications of abuse because self-declared victims tended to focus on these, and these revelations often occurred in a broadly therapeutic context with mental health professionals. Early research into the effects of child sexual abuse frequently employed groups of adult psychiatric patients (Carmen et al. 1984; Mills et al. 1984; Bryer et al. 1987; Jacobson and Richardson 1987; Craine et al. 1988; Oppenheimer et al. 1985) which further reinforced the emergence of an adult-focused psychiatric discourse about child sexual abuse. It should also be noted that the manner in which child sexual abuse was rediscovered (for it had been well recognised in the 19th century) and the nature of the advocacy movement which placed child sexual abuse firmly on the social agenda also provided an almost exclusive emphasis on female victims and incestuous abuse. The implications remain largely unexplored of the abuse of boys (which for abuse of the most intrusive kinds involving penetration rivals in frequency that of girls), and of the fact that the majority of abuse is not incestuous.

https://royalcommbbc.blog/2018/12/21/long-term-effects-of-child-sexual-abuse/

Long-term Effects of Child Sexual Abuse

Child sexual abuse is widely regarded as a cause of mental health problems in adult life. This article examines the impact of child sexual abuse on social, sexual and interpersonal functioning, and its potential role in mediating the more widely recognised impacts on mental health. In discussing the relationship between child sexual abuse and adult psychopathology, the authors evaluate a number of models, including the post-traumatic stress disorder model, the traumatogenic model, and developmental and social models. They look at family risk factors which predispose children from specific population groups to be at greater risk of abuse, and conclude that the fundamental damage caused by child sexual abuse impacts on the child’s developing capacities for trust, intimacy, agency and sexuality.

In little over a decade, child sexual abuse has come to be widely regarded as a cause of mental health problems in adult life. The influences of child sexual abuse on interpersonal, social and sexual functioning in adult life and its possible role in mediating some, if not all, of the deleterious effects on mental health, has attracted less attention and research, but is arguably equally important. For this reason, and because the mental health aspects have been so much more widely canvassed and ably reviewed (Tomison 1996), this review will emphasise the impact of child sexual abuse on social and interpersonal functioning, and its potential role in mediating the more widely recognised impacts on mental health.

Long-term Effects of Child Sexual Abuse 
by Paul E. Mullen and Jillian Fleming
www.aifs.gov

Former students sexually abused at Brisbane Grammar School are turned away by security as they attempt to deliver a letter asking for an admission of a cover-up

  • Students sexually abused attempted to present a letter to school board
  • They had all been abused by pedophile teacher Kevin Lynch in the 70s – 80s
  • They were asking for victim compensation in the letter on Wednesday
  • They also requested the school publicly admit there was a cover up
  • Security at Brisbane Grammar School turned them away on Wednesday 
A group of students (pictued) who were sexually abused while students at Brisbane Grammar School attempted to deliver a letter to the school's board on Wednesday

A group of students (pictued) who were sexually abused while students at Brisbane Grammar School attempted to deliver a letter to the school’s board on Wednesday

They had all been abused by school counsellor Kevin Lynch (pictured) in the 1970s and '80s, and claim the abuses were covered up by principal Maxwell Howell

They had all been abused by school counsellor Kevin Lynch (pictured) in the 1970s and ’80s, and claim the abuses were covered up by principal Maxwell Howell

The group of former students were turned away by school security when they attempted to pass the letter on to management

The group of former students were turned away by school security when they attempted to pass the letter on to management

Colyton Grammar School students look back on last term in promo video

In the letter to Brisbane Grammar School, the group called for the board to publicly admit the school knew about the abuse at the time and there was a cover-up by the former headmaster

In the letter to Brisbane Grammar School, the group called for the board to publicly admit the school knew about the abuse at the time and there was a cover-up by the former headmaster

A spokesman from the group told media that listening to evidence given by other victims to the child sex abuse royal commission had been extremely distressing

A spokesman from the group told media that listening to evidence given by other victims to the child sex abuse royal commission had been extremely distressing

In the letter (pictured) to Brisbane Grammar School, the group called for the board to publicly admit the school knew about the abuse at the time and there was a cover-up by former headmaster Maxwell Howell

In the letter (pictured) to Brisbane Grammar School, the group called for the board to publicly admit the school knew about the abuse at the time and there was a cover-up by former headmaster Maxwell Howell

'We trust that you will now act decisively and without delay to fully address the failing of the past, by providing counselling and compensation to ensure that the abuse of victims is not further protracted,' the letter (pictured) concludes 

‘We trust that you will now act decisively and without delay to fully address the failing of the past, by providing counselling and compensation to ensure that the abuse of victims is not further protracted,’ the letter (pictured) concludes 

Is the Roman Catholic church serious about stopping child abuse? | WINTERY KNIGHT

At the risk of alienating my Catholic readers, I feel that I have to say something about the recent news story about the Catholic Church leaders abusing children of both sexes, and then covering it up. Let’s start with a news article, then a reaction from a Catholic person I respect, then I’ll give my…
— Read on winteryknight.com/2018/08/16/is-the-roman-catholic-church-serious-about-stopping-child-abuse/

Cardinal Pell, top advisor to Pope Francis, found guilty of ‘historical sexual offenses’

NOTE This is a copy of US Media & should be regarded as Fake-News.

An Australian jury has found Cardinal George Pell, 77, guilty on five charges of “historical child sexual offenses” that go back decades, according to various media reports and confirmed by America. The 12-member jury gave their unanimous verdict in the County Court of the State of Victoria in Melbourne on Tuesday, Dec. 11.

The judge decided that the sentencing will take place in early February 2019 and released the cardinal on bail.

Little is known about the nature of the charges on which Cardinal Pell has been condemned because the entire trial and a second trial that has yet to take place are covered by a strict suppression order issued by the presiding judge, Peter Kidd. The order prohibits reporting on the case in any of the country’s media until the second trial has taken place to avoid prejudicing his case in both instances. The judge has prohibited the publication of the number of complainants in either of the two trials as well as the number and nature of the charges, except for the fact that the charges relate to “historical child sexual offenses.”

An Australian jury has found Cardinal George Pell, 77, guilty on five charges of historical sexual offenses.

The cardinal is the most senior churchman yet to be convicted of such offenses, though he is not the third-ranking Vatican official, as some media have reported. His conviction is a grave blow not only to the church in Australia but also to the Vatican and to Pope Francis, who placed great trust in him by nominating the Australian prelate to his nine-member Council of Cardinal Advisors (he was the only cardinal from Oceania at that time, and Francis chose one cardinal from each continent) and by appointing him as prefect of the Secretariat of the Economy with a sweeping mandate to reform Vatican finances.

Cardinal Pell made great headway in those reform efforts, but he was not finished that work when he decided to return to Australia to respond to the allegations of historical sexual offenses. The cardinal has always maintained his innocence. Committal hearings were held in May at the end of which the presiding magistrate, while dismissing some of the most serious charges, ordered him to stand trial on the other charges.

His lawyers and the Victoria State public prosecutors agreed to split the charges against him into two trials: one relating to alleged sexual offenses committed at the cathedral in Melbourne (the first trial known as “the cathedral trial”) and the other for abuse said to have been committed in Ballarat, reportedly at a swimming pool (known as “the swimmers trial”). Yesterday’s verdict comes from the first trial. That trial began in September but the jury could not reach a verdict, and so a new trial began in November which resulted in yesterday’s verdict. The second trial is expected to take place early in 2019, probably around mid-February or early March, after the sentencing related to the first verdict has taken place.

Cardinal Pell’s conviction is a grave blow not only to the church in Australia but also to the Vatican and to Pope Francis.

The Vatican has not commented on the news of the cardinal’s conviction out of respect for the suppression order. On Wednesday, Dec. 12., the director of the Holy See Press Office, Greg Burke, responding to a question at a press brief in the Vatican about whether the cardinal would remain as prefect of the Secretariat for the Economy in the light of his judicial situation told reporters, “That is a good question.”

He then added, “The Holy See has the utmost respect for the Australian judicial authorities. We are aware there is a suppression order in place and we respect that order.”

Pope Francis told journalists in an airborne press conference earlier this year that he would speak only after the judicial process (which includes the possibility of appeal after sentencing) had run its course. Sources say the cardinal, who has always insisted in this innocence, will appeal.

The conviction of another Australian archbishop, Philip Wilson, was overturned by an appeals court, and sources believe the case of Cardinal Pell could follow suit.

Pope Francis has said he would speak only after the judicial process had run its course.

Pope Francis “granted Cardinal Pell a leave of absence so he could defend himself from the accusations” on June 29, 2017. Since then, the cardinal has been unable to carry out his responsibilities as prefect of the Secretariat of the Economy, a senior position in the Vatican, and as a member of the pope’s council of nine cardinals advisors.

Prior to his leave of absence—when allegations became public and some thought the pope should have removed Cardinal Pell from office—Francis applied the principle of law known as “in dubio pro reo” (“doubt favors the accused”), insisting that a person is to be considered innocent until proven guilty. The pope did not remove Cardinal Pell from his Vatican posts then because he believed to do so would be equivalent to an admission of guilt. Francis explained his stance in a press conference on the return flight from World Youth Day in Poland, July 31, 2016. He said: “We have to wait for the justice system to do its job and not pass judgment in the media because this is not helpful. ‘Judgment’ by gossip, and then what? We don’t know how it will turn out. See what the justice system decides. Once it has spoken, then I will speak.”

Pope Francis’ words make clear that he does not intend to speak until the judicial process, including a possible appeal, has ended. He has, however, terminated Cardinal Pell’s membership of the council of nine cardinal advisors, Mr. Burke, indicated on Dec. 12. Mr. Burke revealed that at the end of October, the pope sent a letter thanking Cardinals Pell, Francisco Javier Errazuriz (Chile) and Laurent Monswengo Pasinya (Democratic Republic of the Congo) for their work in his council of cardinal advisors over the past five years.

Cardinal Pell could decide to hand in his resignation as prefect of the Secretariat for the Economy, since it is unlikely that his second trial and an eventual appeal will have taken place by the time his five-year term as prefect expires on Feb. 24. The cardinal, who will be 78 in June, could also resign from his other roles in various Roman Curia departments and offices. Currently, he is a member of the Congregation for Bishops, the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples, the Congregation for the Institutes of Consecrated Life and the Societies of Apostolic Life and the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of the New Evangelization.

Regardless, Cardinal Pell is not allowed to carry out any pastoral ministry in public until the whole judicial process has ended, and then only if the verdict is in his favor.

Gerard O’Connell

Gerard O’Connell is America’s Vatican correspondent.

https://www.americamagazine.org/faith/2018/12/12/cardinal-pell-top-advisor-pope-francis-found-guilty-historical-sexual-offenses