‘Free-balls’, until 2002?

Until 2001/2 there appears to have been no Government controls over most Private Schools. Known as “Accreditation of Non-State Schools”, until the introduction of the 2006 Act, all that appears to be available was the ‘Education (General Provisions) Act 1989 (Qld)’. Memories of Buchanan and Bradley seemingly rubbing the noses of their victims, in BBC’s non-inclusions of the 1989 Act were experienced by many. Each of these Victims do have NRS Compensation-Support-Apologies available to them (minimum).

Of particular note in Qld Gov’s Objectives of the 2017 version: “to maintain public confidence in the operation of non-State Schools”. How much does this seem defensive, of the decades + decades of abhorrent ‘kiddie-fiddling’ which ran riot in our ‘Elite Schools of Excellence’?


The following processes, must now be provided to all students:

  • a. the reporting, by a student to a stated staff member, of behaviour of another staff member that the student considered inappropriate
  • how the information reported must be dealt with
  • the reporting, by a staff member to the School’s Principal, of harm of which the staff member is aware, or the staff member reasonably suspects to have been caused to a student under 18 years
  • the reporting of harm or suspected harm by the Principal to a relevant State Authority.

Available via LIBRARY (pdf) …

CARC. (2017). Case Study 34: INQUIRY INTO THE EXPERIENCE OF BRISBANE GRAMMAR SCHOOL AND ST PAUL’S SCHOOL IN QUEENSLAND.

Education (General Provisions) Act 1989. Queensland Parliament. The Office of the Queensland Parliamentary Counsel.

Education (General Provisions) Act 2006. Queensland Parliament. The Office of the Queensland Parliamentary Counsel.

Education (General Provisions) Act 2017. Queensland Parliament. The Office of the Queensland Parliamentary Counsel.


“Brave New World” … ?!


After Australia’s July 2020 weekend of ‘Black Lives Matter’, ABC’s Afternoon Briefing had Patricia Karvelas interviewing US Prof. Goff (sp.?). For many Survivours of Child Sexual Abuse, much of these debates have carried the same passion as what we’ve felt throughout our lives. Ignorance & turning attention away from are even spoken against in the bible. School lessons. Child care. Sports practice. School camps. A pattern forming…?

Black Lives Matter

JOE MCKENDRY

News of Jeffery Epstein also forms ‘front page news’, including parts of the British Royal Family, upper levels of US & International society. At the targeted end of this game are low income, low SES (socio economic status) population & young adults/teenagers. Suitably, Australia’s Judicial System has begun to publicly deal with more allegations following 2013-17 CARC. Highest of these has been George Pell. Sound familiar…?

From the topics presented since 2013, this RoyalCommBBC.blog has aimed to republish noteworthy journalism, factually-based info & ‘the other side of the coin’ POV. We don’t claim to be a Journalistic Reference to prove legal data; it isn’t to be used as an excuse or a bet; links can be arranged with suitable portals, where need be; as are related channels, following earlier BBC involvement of later ‘guilty’ Nudgee College staff. A later post will be arranged re: queries of Overlack. Seems too surreal…?

TOWARDS RECOVERY

BLUE KNOT FOUNDATION FACT SHEET FOR PEOPLE WHO HAVE EXPERIENCED CHILDHOOD TRAUMA (INCLUDING ABUSE)

1 Childhood trauma stems from overwhelming negative experiences in early life. It can take many forms (eg. sexual,emotional,physicalabuseandneglect).Itcanalso occur without abuse if early caregivers were unable
to meet your emotional needs (e.g. because they had unresolved trauma histories themselves).

2 Unresolved childhood trauma negatively impacts 8 health and well-being in adulthood. It affects both emotional and physical health (the whole person’)
and the full impacts may not become apparent until
years later.

3 It is possible to heal from childhood trauma. Research shows that with the right support, even severe early life trauma can be resolved. It also shows that when an adult has resolved their childhood trauma, it benefits their children or the children they may later have.
Children develop coping mechanisms to deal with the effects of childhood trauma. It is normal to want to feel better, and if you were traumatised as a child the need to escape’ feelings can be intense.

4 Effects of childhood trauma include anxiety, depression, health problems (emotional and physical), disconnection, isolation, confusion, being ‘spaced out’, and fear of intimacy and new experiences. There 10 is no one size fits all’, but reduced quality of life is a constant.

5 Survivors are often on ‘high alert’. Even minor stress can trigger ‘out of proportion’ responses. Your body continues to react as if you are still in danger, and this can be explained in terms of unresolved prior experience.

6 Survivors often struggle with shame and self-blame. But childhood trauma and its established effects are NOT your fault, even though you may feel otherwise (often because this is what you were encouraged to believe as a child when you were vulnerable and still developing).

7 Self-blame can be especially strong if you experienced any positive physical sensations (which is not an uncommon body response) in relation to abuse you have undergone. Physical reaction to sexual abuse does NOT mean desire for, or agreement to, it. Children cannot consent to, much less ‘cause’, sexual or other forms of abuse.

8 Children develop coping mechanisms to deal with the effects of childhood trauma. It is normal to want to feel better, and if you were traumatised as a child the need to `escape’ feelings can be intense.

9 Coping mechanisms develop for a reason, serve a purpose, and can be highly effective in the short term. But some methods of coping (e.g. excessive alcohol use) can be risky in themselves. Addictions (to food, sex, drugs), avoidance of contact with others (which reinforces isolation) and compulsive behaviours of various kinds (in attempts to run from the underlying problem which, because it is unaddressed, doesn’t go away) are all ways people try to cope.

10 Coping mechanisms develop for a reason, serve a purpose, and can be highly effective in the short term. But some methods of coping (e.g. excessive alcohol use) can be risky in themselves. Addictions (to food, sex, drugs), avoidance of contact with others (which reinforces isolation) and compulsive behaviours of various kinds (in attempts to run from the underlying problem which, because it is unaddressed, doesn’t go away) are all ways people try to cope.

11 Coping mechanisms develop for a reason, serve a purpose, and can be highly effective in the short term. But some methods of coping (e.g. excessive alcohol use) can be risky in themselves. Addictions (to food, sex, drugs), avoidance of contact with others (which reinforces isolation) and compulsive behaviours of various kinds (in attempts to run from the underlying problem which, because it is unaddressed, doesn’t go away) are all ways people try to cope.

RETRIEVED https://www.blueknot.org.au/Portals/2/Fact%20Sheets%20Info/Fact_Sheet_Survivors.pdf

Institutions Who Haven’t Signed For Redress Will Be Stripped of Charity Status

Peter Kelso | National Redress Scheme | Feb 19, 2020


Image source: Clan

Government will strip the charity status from churches who miss the National Redress Scheme deadline

Minister for Families and Social Services, Ms Anne Ruston says the government may strip charity status from churches and organisations that fail to sign up to the National Redress Scheme.

They will also lose tax exemption status.

Senator Ruston said the government had accepted “every recommendation that we are able to accept” in its response to the standing committee’s recommendations for the Scheme it returned on Monday, and that it should be announced publicly within 48 hours.

She also said about 700 victims’ applications have had to be put on hold because there is no organisation signed up to match them with. Many organisations (such as Swimming Australia) aren’t signing up due to fears of becoming bankrupt.

One major group which has not signed up to the Redress Scheme is the Jehovah’s Witnesses (the JW’s). The Royal Commission heard that 1,006 plausible complaints of child sexual abuse had been received by the JW’s in Australia but no alleged perpetrators had been reported to the police. It appears that the JW’s would have a substantial financial exposure if it joined the Scheme.

Alternatively, the JW’s may be stripped of its charity status if it fails to sign up by the 30 June 2020 deadline.

The JW’s have refused to remove sex offenders from congregations unless the victim can produce a second witness. The organisation was criticized for its ‘Second Witness Rule’ by the Royal Commission.

The JW’s global operations are controlled by a Governing Body of eight men from JW headquarters in Warwick, New York State, USA. The decision to join or not to join the Redress Scheme is the responsibility of the US Governing Body.

JW’s have a history of distrust of the government, refusing to vote and avoiding military service. They are banned in China, Russia, Singapore and most Muslim majority countries. They are most active in the USA, Mexico and Brazil. JW’s were once banned in Canada.

On the other hand, Hillsong Church and the leading Pentecostal umbrella group, Australian Christian Churches, have all signed up to the National Redress Scheme. (Hillsong Church is now a separate legal entity from ACC).

The addition of non-government institutions, including Hillsong Church, Australian Christian Churches (ACC), C3 Churches, Churches of Christ, Baptists, Christian Schools Australia and Barnardo’s Australia, has more than doubled the number of non-government groups in the scheme from 67 to 162 in one year.

Get the justice you deserve with Kelso Lawyers. We want to hear your story. Call (02) 4907 4200 or complete the online form before you accept payment from the National Redress Scheme.

RETRIEVED https://kelsolawyers.com/au/institutions-who-havent-signed-for-redress-will-be-stripped-of-charity-status

Sometimes, it can be the simplest of things : Caning

Winnie-the-Pooh

Particularly, Rudd house / Boarders may have experienced more than the Day boys from a single to constant Canings via anyone is ‘Corporal Punishment of a minor’ : aka Phyysical Child Abuse. There is no wonder it was outlawed in Public Education, gradually followed by Private Edu (1990’s). Even use of Caning as a threat results in the same level of Redress: 100-500’s each yr X $5,000 (min.) : $500,000-$2,500,000 / yr may make lasting impact on ANY Institution (Church-State-Private).

‘from lil things big things grow’ over http://changefactory.wpengine.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/Successful-EDRMS-From-Little-Things-Big-Things-Grow.pdf

Imagine these figures, spread throughout each City-State-Town + Coupled with Public Apologies + Counselling-Support: the immense multitude of ‘the masses’ of impacted Students, Parents, Families throughout ANY Institution may be quite profound. Another perspective (POV) is painted by ‘from little things, big things grow’. EDRMS also explain that compliance is strengthened by good recordkeeping and systems. A solid evidence base is essential for these commitments.

NRS header image

Using this common phrase as incentive, so much can be gained for anyone whose been through. Physical Abuse, through Caning, has been used as the example of this post. From NRS site – Who can Apply is simply explained: https://www.nationalredress.gov.au/applying/who-can-apply. Feedback is encouraged, whether anonymously/pseudonym/name via WP, FB, eMail or Twitter.


Circumstances that might affect how your application is processed

Depending on your circumstances, your application may progress to assessment differently. These circumstances include if you:

The State + Commonwealth Attorney-Generals should show sensitivity to any of the resulting effects, from experienced CSA. Extensive amounts of information is provided + submission of Applicants.


REFERENCES

EDRMS. 2011. Successful EDRMS From Little Things Big Things Grow. http://www.changefactory.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/Successful-EDRMS-From-Little-Things-Big-Things-Grow.pdf

National Redress Scheme. 2020. Who can apply. https://www.nationalredress.gov.au/applying/who-can-apply

Winnie-the-Pooh. 2012. Sometimes the smallest things take up the most room in your heart. Retrieved http://power2thecore.blogspot.com/2012/09/sometimes-smallest-things-take-up-most.html

This month in the National Redress Scheme – January 2020

National Redress Scheme – January 2020 

This newsletter gives you an update on the National Redress Scheme, including how to, and where to get support, recent progress on applications and new developments in the Scheme.

Redress Support Services

This newsletter contains material that could be confronting and stressing. Sometimes words or images can cause sadness or distress or trigger traumatic memories for people, particularly for those people who have experienced past abuse or childhood trauma.

There are free and confidential Redress Support Services to help you. They can support you before, during and after you apply for redress. Services can provide practical and emotional support, legal advice and financial counselling. If you need immediate help or counselling, 24/7 support is available. 

Please visit the National Redress Scheme at www.nationalredress.gov.au/support/explore for a full list of support service providers. 

Application progress as at 3 January 2020

As at 3 January 2020, the Scheme had 

  • had received over 5,829 applications
  • made 1,194 decisions, including 975 payments totalling over $79.3 million
  • made 148 offers of redress, which applicants have six months to consider
  • was processing 3,733 applications
  • had 898 applications on hold, including 557 because one or more institutions named had not yet joined and about 341 because they required additional information from the applicant.

From 1 July 2019 to 3 January 2020, 747 applications were finalised, resulting in 736 payments. This is more than the 239 payments made in the first year of the Scheme. 

Ministers Redress Scheme Governance Meeting 

On Friday 29 November 2019, the Minister for Families and Social Services, Senator the Hon Anne Ruston, hosted the Ministers Redress Scheme Governance Board meeting with relevant ministers with responsibility for the National Redress Scheme in their State or Territory.
Ministers were unanimous in their commitment to the timely delivery of redress and providing greater accountability and transparency to the Scheme. Ministers also agreed that non-participating institutions should join the Scheme without delay to ensure survivors receive the support and acknowledgement they are waiting for. 

You can find out more about this at www.dss.gov.au/about-the-department/news/60996

Working with Knowmore – Understand your Journey

The Knowmore legal service is for anyone who is considering applying for redress under the National Redress Scheme. The service is free, confidential and independent.

The team at Knowmore can provide information, advice and options available to survivors of institutional child sexual abuse. This includes:

  • making a claim under the National Redress Scheme
  • providing details about payment that may be available through other Schemes
  • providing information about possible civil litigation claims and the names of specialist layers who could help a survivor with such a claim. 

Knowmore has offices in Western Australia, Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria. You can call Knowmore on 1800 605 762 or TTY 1800 555 677, then 1800 605 762
National Relay Service: 1800 555 727, then 1800 605 762

Find out more

To find out more about the National Redress Scheme, go to www.nationalredress.gov.au or call 1800 737 377 from Australia or +61 3 6222 3455 from overseas (Monday to Friday8am – 5pm local time

Perpetrators in hunting ground … ?!

As to the rites of any Student, the following copies were taken of some of BBC’s Predators: (Buchanan (Butch) & Dutton to be added; BBC Portal 1990)

Michael Golding, Music

Murre-Alan, Music

Update on Redress in Australia | BLM Abuse & Neglect News blog

As readers of our blog will be aware the Australian National Redress Scheme opened for applications on the 1 July, 2018 and it will remain open for 10 years. When the Government committed to establishing the National Redress Scheme (NRS) it was expected that there would be 60,000 to 65,000 applicants and that the redress…
— Read on blmabuseandneglectblog.com/2019/06/07/update-on-redress-in-australia/

Understanding your legal rights under the National Redress Scheme

This newsletter provides you with information about your legal options in regards to the National Redress Scheme (the Scheme).

For more information or to find support services, visit the http://nationalredress.gov.au/ or call 1800 737 377 Monday to Friday (local time) excluding public holidays.

Understanding your legal rights under the National Redress Scheme

You are not required to use a lawyer to apply for redress. However, you may wish to seek legal advice to understand if redress if the best option for you and the impact it may have on other legal rights.

If you want to access legal support, the Scheme offers free legal advice through knowmore or call 1800 605 762 (Free call).

You can also choose to use a private lawyer. This will be at your own cost. Below are some questions you may have regarding the use of lawyers and the Scheme. 

Frequently Asked Questions

 

Am I required to seek legal advice?

No. However, you may wish to seek legal advice as this may help you through the process and allow you to completely understand your legal rights.

Can I get free legal advice?

Yes. The Scheme provides free legal support services through ‘knowmore’.

What can knowmore provide?

knowmore is available for free to all people thinking about applying to the Scheme.

knowmore can provide you with:

  • legal support through the application process,
  • legal advice on your options, including the availability of other forms of action or redress aside from the Scheme,
  • assistance understanding the legal effects of accepting an offer of redress,
  • advice on the effect of confidentiality agreements in past proceedings,
  • take complaints about the Scheme,
  • support obtaining records,
  • linking with specialist counselling, support services and victims’ support groups, and
  • any other legal support needs, through providing information and referral support.

 

What is knowmore?

knowmore is a legal service funded by the Commonwealth Government through the Attorney-General’s Department.

knowmore delivers free services nationally from its three offices in Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney with regular visits to other States and Territories. These services are delivered through its multidisciplinary team of lawyers, social workers and counsellors.

knowmore has a proven track record of providing legal support services to survivors of child sexual abuse. It has the infrastructure and expertise deliver national, quality and trauma‑informed legal services.
 

Do I have to use knowmore?

No. You are not required to seek legal advice to apply to the Scheme. You can also use a private lawyer. This may be at your own cost.
 

Should I seek legal advice?

You may wish to seek legal advice, with the Scheme offering free advice through knowmore. While the Scheme is designed to be non-legalistic, some people may need help to complete their application to ensure that all the necessary information has been included. knowmore can help with this.

For many people making an application for redress will be the right thing to do. However, not everyone is eligible for redress. Some people may also want to consider if civil litigation is a better option for them.

If you have received redress under other schemes or through past actions or claims you can still apply to this Scheme; however, prior payments may be taken into account.

If you accept an offer of redress you must sign a release document. By signing this release, you will not be able to continue or to commence any civil or common law proceedings against the responsible institution or its officials. This is an important right to give up. knowmore can give you advice about the release and the legal options that you might have apart from redress.
 

Where do I get support?

Redress Support Services are available to help people understand the Scheme, provide emotional support and guide people through the application process. A list of support services is available on the website.

Those who need immediate emotional support can contact:
·         Beyond Blue 1300 224 636
·        
 Mensline 1300 78 99 78
·        
 Lifeline 13 11 14
·        
 1800 Respect 1800 737 732
·        
 Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467
·         In an emergency call Triple Zero (000)

 

Find out more

To find out more, you can call the National Redress Scheme on 1800 737 377Monday to Friday, 8am to 5pm (local time), excluding public holidays. You can also visit the website the National Redress Scheme website.


RETRIEVED eMail & https://mailchi.mp/4da97a10e5de/understanding-your-legal-rights-under-the-national-redress-scheme?e=5ccca9918d

Child abuse survivors ‘can still seek damages after redress payouts’ – The Scotsman

Child
— Read on www.scotsman.com/