Direct personal responses

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Introduction

A direct personal response (DPR) is one of the 3 components offered through the Scheme to eligible people.

Participating in a DPR is an opportunity for people who have experienced abuse while in the ‘care’ of an institution to share their experience of abuse, to the extent they wish to do so, with a representative of the institution and to have them hear, recognise and acknowledge their story. The institution’s representative may apologise on behalf of the institution and explain the steps the institution has taken or will take to prevent abuse happening again in the future.

A DPR can be given through a face-to-face meeting between a person and a representative of the institution, a written letter, or any other method preferred by the person and agreed to by the institution.

All participating institutions must participate in a DPR with a person who requests it, except where it would risk causing harm. Institutions must provide DPRs in line with the NRS DPR Framework.

Taken from NRS, 2022: https://guides.dss.gov.au/national-redress-guide/5/3

Although this provided DPR info sounds fairly straight-forward, I can let readers know that it’s far from that. For some of us who’re also dealing with related issues, having to relive the same moments for unfamiliar ’help’ can unfortunately cause you to relive the same moments for the 3rd-4th-or even 5th time! It’s great having a chance to reconnect, with those ’in the know’ who’ll be able to recognise your past-current-future lifestyle. This can be a great stage, to finally get ’official statements’ for YOUR ordeals – directly! Please take it from someone whose had to go off the comfortable track – reach out to the suitable Counselling people.

Thanks to Australia’s impact of climate change & covid19:

  • my NRS 1. has been submitted;
  • NRS 2. still awaiting ”Institutional Responses”;
  • NRS 3. is now having experienced Counsellors helping me.
#mackaycartoons, retrieved 2022.

“There’s always a bigger wave …” (common saying). CSA Survivours should try to keep in mind, that you’re not in this alone + they’re more sources coming forward: other surviving-victims, Counsellors, Government Sources & Law-enforcement (Police, solicitors & judges).

REFERENCES

The National Redress Scheme – Newsletter

National Redress Scheme – Update

22 December 2020


This newsletter covers an update on the National Redress Scheme (the Scheme). It provides a list of accessible Redress Support Services for the Christmas period, a link to new video resources, an update on institutions and recent Scheme data.

The update contains material that could be confronting or distressing. Sometimes words or images can cause sadness or distress or trigger traumatic memories, particularly for people who have experienced past abuse or childhood trauma. 

Support is available to help you if you need it.  To find out more, go to www.nationalredress.gov.au/support.

If you need immediate support, 24-hour telephone assistance is available through:

Redress Support Services available between Christmas and New Year

The Scheme recognises that the Christmas period can be a difficult time for some people.  We would like to take this opportunity to advise you of the Redress Support Services availability throughout this period.

The following Redress Support Services are available except on public holidays:

  • Child Migrants Trust
  • Danila Dilba Health Service
  • Drummond Street Services
  • In Good Faith Foundation
  • Micah Projects
  • Ngarra Jarra Noun – Victorian Aboriginal Child Care Agency Co-operative.

Contact details are available at https://www.nationalredress.gov.au/support.

New Video Resources

The Scheme is pleased to inform you that two videos designed to raise awareness and inform people of the Queensland Government’s participation in the National Redress Scheme have been completed and are now live.

You can view the videos on the Queensland Government’s website: https://www.qld.gov.au/community/getting-support-health-social-issue/support-victims-abuse/national-redress-scheme/resources.

Institutions

The Scheme is continuously working with institutions that have been named in applications or identified by other means to encourage them to join and participate in the Scheme.  To date the Commonwealth, all state and territory governments and 358 non-government institutions covering around 56,061 sites such as churches, schools, homes, charities and community groups across Australia are participating.

A total of 158 non-government institutions have committed to join and finalise on-boarding by no later than 31 December 2020.

For the latest information about institutions, visit our website: https://www.nationalredress.gov.au/institutions

Application progress as at 18 December 2020

As at 18 December 2020, the Scheme:

  • had received 9,008 applications.
  • had made 5,262 decisions.
  • issued 5,113 outcomes.
  • finalised 4,503 applications, including 4,464 payments totaling approximately $371.2 million.
  • had made 563 offers of redress, which are currently with applicants to consider.
  • was processing 4,188 applications.

Find out more

To find out more about the Scheme, go to www.nationalredress.gov.au or call 1800 737 377 from Australia or +61 3 6222 3455 from overseas.
 
For regular updates about the Department of Social Services and the Scheme, you can ‘like’ or ‘follow’ the Australian Families Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/FamiliesInAustralia/