Australian Government Response

Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse: Final Report

The achievements of the Royal Commission and the commitments in this Australian Government Response are a tribute to the survivors and victims of institutional child sexual abuse, their families and supporters. Their courage has helped to create a culture of accountability and of trust in children’s voices that will help all of us to take responsibility for keeping children safe and well.

The Australian Government has listened to the Royal Commission and to survivors and victims of institutional child sexual abuse. The Australian Government acknowledges that much more needs to be done to prevent and protect children from sexual abuse in institutions.

Cultural change in our institutions and society more broadly, is fundamental to ensuring the safety of our children. Changing our institutional cultures and providing the legal and practical safeguards to support that change will take some time. Many of Australia’s governments and institutions have already acted to start that change, knowing that giving redress and comfort to survivors and protecting children into the future is urgent and cannot wait. In this response, the Australian Government has recognised and acknowledged that there must be change, but has also highlighted where genuine efforts at reform are being made.

On 15 December 2017, the Royal Commission submitted its Final Report to the Governor-General, His Excellency General the Honourable Sir Peter Cosgrove AK MC (Retd). The Final Report was tabled in the Australian Parliament the same day.

The Royal Commission recommended the Australian Government and all state and territory governments should issue a formal response to the Final Report within six months of it being tabled.

Of the 409 recommendations in the Final Report, 84 recommendations deal with redress, which the Australian Government is responding to through the creation of the National Redress Scheme for people who have experienced institutional child sexual abuse. Of the remaining 325 recommendations, 122 have been directed wholly or partially to the Australian Government. The Response accepts, or accepts in principle 104 of these 122 recommendations. The remaining 18 recommendations directed at the Australian Government are listed as being ‘for further consideration’ or are ‘noted’. The Australian Government has not rejected any of the recommendations.

The Australian Government has also ‘noted’ some recommendations that fall within the leadership and responsibility of state and territory governments or that the Royal Commission directed to religious or other non-government institutions. The Australian Government will continue to work closely with all governments and institutions, including religious institutions, to promote children’s safety and wellbeing. Our expectation is that other governments and institutions will respond to each of the Royal Commission’s recommendations, indicating what action they will take in response to them and will report on their implementation of relevant recommendations annually in December, along with the Australian, state and territory governments. Where other governments and institutions decide not to accept the Royal Commission’s recommendations they should state so and why.

The Australian Government thanks the Commissioners, Mr Bob Atkinson AO APM, Justice Jennifer Coate, Mr Robert Fitzgerald AM, Professor Helen Milroy, Mr Andrew Murray and the Chair of the Royal Commission, the Hon Justice Peter McClellan AM, for their leadership and compassion throughout the Royal Commission and for delivering such a significant report for our nation. The Australian Government is grateful to the staff, expert witnesses, researchers, stakeholder groups, and government and non-government representatives who came forward to share their knowledge and experience. The Australian Government also acknowledges the spirit of commitment demonstrated by all state and territory governments during the Royal Commission and in working to address its recommendations. Most importantly, the Australian Government thanks the survivors and victims of institutional child sexual abuse, together with their families and supporters, for their courage and determination in telling their stories and for raising the awareness needed to protect our children.

The Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP The Hon Christian Porter MP

Prime Minister of Australia Attorney-General

(Retrieved from https://www.ag.gov.au/RightsAndProtections/Australian-Government-Response-to-the-Royal-Commission-into-Institutional-Responses-to-Child-Sexual-Abuse/Documents/australian-government-response-introduction.docx)

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Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS National)

Translating and Interpretation Services are available for the National Redress Scheme. For more info, https://www.tisnational.gov.au/ has further details. Contact TIS National, Support Groups or Message us now.

The Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS National) provides access to phone and on-site interpreting services in over 150 languages.
— Read on www.tisnational.gov.au/

Western Australian Government to join the Scheme

The National Redress Scheme welcomes the formal announcement that the Western Australian Government will participate in the Scheme.

This significant announcement means that the Scheme will be truly national, now that every state and territory government has agreed to participate. This achieves one of the Royal Commission’s central recommendations to establish a single national redress scheme to deliver justice for people who experienced institutional child sexual abuse.

This commitment means people who experienced institutional child sexual abuse in Western Australian Government institutions will also be able to access redress. It will also allow non-government organisations to provide redress for abuse which occurred in Western Australia.

Six major churches and charities have also agreed to join the Scheme– the Catholic Church, Anglican Church, Uniting Church, The Salvation Army, YMCA and Scouts Australia.

Western Australia will need to pass legislation in order to participate, which may happen early next year, but people can still apply from 1 July 2018.

The National Redress Scheme will commence on 1 July 2018. Applications can be submitted online, or in paper form.

Where do I get support?

Support services made available as part of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse are available to assist people who experienced institutional child sexual abuse. Contact details for these support services can be found on the Department of Social Services’ website.

For more information about the National Redress Scheme, see www.dss.gov.au/redress, or contact the National Redress Scheme Information Line on 1800 146 713.

Those who need immediate assistance can contact:

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

Lifeline 13 11 14

1800 Respect 1800 737 732

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467

Mensline 1300 78 99 78

• In an emergency call Triple Zero (000)

Legislation passed for the National Redress Scheme

We are pleased to announce that the Australian Parliament has passed legislation for the National Redress Scheme. This has paved the way for the Scheme to commence as planned on 1 July 2018.

The National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse Bill 2018 was passed on 19 June 2018 and received Royal Assent on 22 June 2018.

This significant milestone is the product of the extensive work of support groups, advocates and people who have experienced institutional child sexual abuse.

Applications can be submitted from 1 July 2018 and people can apply online or by paper form.

Where do I get support?

Support services made available as part of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse are available to assist people who experienced institutional child sexual abuse. Contact details for these support services can be found on the Department of Social Services’ website.

For more information about the National Redress Scheme, see www.dss.gov.au/redress, or contact the National Redress Scheme Information Line on 1800 146 713.

Those who need immediate assistance can contact:

• Lifeline on 13 11 14

• 1800Respect on 1800 737 732

• MensLine Australia on 1300 789 978

Noteworthy CSA Posts : similarities?

Illumine

In the midnight of black-out curtains

I see that bright light again

though it’s slower this time

spreading across my face

like it wants me to see it

lingering to illumine

but this is not a tunnel to Heaven.

A man’s weight presses down on me

I won’t shift his presence for days

and cries drawn out will remain in my ears

whether fear, pain, horror

it’s clear they are mine

I sound like a child being hurt

with no way out.

That familiar pain in the PFC*

What did they do to me?

*Prefrontal cortex

© 2018 archaeotrauma

The Birth of a Book- The story of a ForgWhy The Impact of Child Abuse otten Australian

Sixty years later my friend courageously gave evidence to the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.  Her life has been a battle to recover from the abuse that was perpetrated against her as a child.   Its been an honour to hear and record her story.  Now I just need to find a way so you can hear it too.

Extends Well Into Adulthood

Research finds that child abuse harms mental and physical health in adulthood.

Child abuse, Signs of Hope & Study findings.

The study’s lead author, Abigail Millings of the University of Bristol, commented in a research summary that researchers sought to examine how caregiving plays out in families: “…how one relationship affects another relationship. We wanted to see how romantic relationships between parents might be associated with what kind of parents they are. Our work is the first to look at romantic caregiving and parenting styles at the same time.”

The research found – no surprise – that “a common skill set underpins caregiving across different types of relationships, and for both mothers and fathers. If you can do responsive caregiving, it seems that you can do it across different relationships.”

Millings added, ”It might be the case that practicing being sensitive and responsive — for example, by really listening and by really thinking about the other person’s perspective — to our partners will also help us to improve these skills with our kids.”

Common Institution comments

Victim told not to report abuse claims

‘Don’t talk to the police, we’ll deal with it. He won’t take the tour again.’

(Commissioner) McClellan he let me know that ‘the teacher you’re here about has been made known to us on a number of occasions before’.”

… alleges the school failed to ensure his safety, failed to maintain procedures for the imposition of discipline and proper protocols for student-staff interactions.

He said he reported the abuse to the school but his account was rejected as “false and dishonest”. Soon afterwards, the officer was dismissed.

The royal commission heard a group of paedophile teachers were abusing children at the school, many of whom have been charged and convicted of child sex offences.

Imagine the floodgates that will open, upon the activation of updated Commonwealth & state laws, along with public access to Private Schools (hidden) data around Australia!

BlueKnot & LivingWell are but 2 Support Groups who offer worthwhile help. Others are listed here on knowmore.

RoyalCommBBC.blog is joining the dots of the moments dealt with by the Institutions Responses into Child Sexual Abuse to Royal Commission.

Facts about Child Sex Abuse (maltreatment)

A child cannot consent to any form of sexual activity, period.

Physical abuse is just one type of child abuse.

– physical

– neglect

– sexual

– emotional

It crosses all racial, economic, and cultural lines. Most abusers are family members or others close to the family. Occasionally strangers who’ve heard of how other dynamics occur. While data differs, Sexual Abuse is often lowest of these 4 readings.

Comparison: Cannes and BBC

The powerful speech @AsiaArgento during the closing ceremony of Cannes. “I was raped here in 1997 by Harvey Weinstein.” Going on to describe Cannes as HW’s hunting ground; many BBC past Students & their Families will remember how BBC was remembered as a ‘hunting ground’. Even the term “hunting ground” can be remembered in some of BBC’s (un-admitted) Offenders of the 1990’s. Perhaps this why any public announcements correlate with a psychological effect, that’s been hidden to some level. Even decades and decades after the events happened, any reminders of them may trigger some reaction(s).

This is where LivingWell have provided their resources, suitable to these male Survivours and their Families. “We all benefit from maps of life’s territories. We do not live our lives in straight lines” is from the Indigenous themed clip ‘No Straight Lines’.