Emotional Support and Adult Depression in Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse

Katherine L. Muslinera and Jonathan B. Singer

KEYWORDS: childhood sexual abuse; emotional support; depression; parents; friends


Opening its Abstract with “The goals of this study were to evaluate the effects of emotional support from friends and parents at two time points (adolescence and adulthood) on adult depression in a nationally representative sample of survivors of childhood sexual abuse (CSA), and examine whether the associations were moderated by the identity of the perpetrator (parent/caregiver vs. not).” (Abstract 2012 p1)

Emotional Support and CSA

The Role of the Timing of Support – Does it Matter When?

Current study

Method | Data, Measures, Data Analysis

Results | Descriptive Statistics, Effects of Emotional Support on Adult Depression, Moderation by Perpetrator Identity (see NOTE)

NOTE: “There was, however, a statistically significant interaction between parental support in adulthood and perpetrator identity (p = .02). As shown in Table 4, among survivors of non-parent/caregiver abuse, high support from parents in adulthood reduced the odds of depression by 67% (p < .0001), and high support from friends in adulthood reduced the odds of depression by 42% (p = .02). Among survivors of parent/caregiver abuse, none of the emotional support variables were significantly associated with adult depression.”

Moderation by Gender | Discussion, Limitations, Conclusions

Acknowledgments | Footnotes | References


There was a significant change in Victims-Survivours + when they reached Adulthood, after non-parent/caregiver abuse. You can still get Counselling, without ‘Reporting an Incident’. These can give Surviving Victims of CSA greater confidence + strength in their lives. (see Results, Moderation by Perpetrator Identity (see NOTE above)


RETRIEVED https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4383236/