Jury discharged in trial of former Brisbane Boys College teacher charged with indecent treatment

May 9, 2019 1:10am Kay DibbenThe Courier-Mail

Former Brisbane Boys College teacher, Nicholas Lloyd (sunglasses) pictured leaving the District and Supreme Court, Brisbane. Picture: AAP Image/Josh Woning

THE JURY in the trial of a former Brisbane Boys College science teacher charged with indecent treatment of a male student more than 20 years ago has been discharged.

Brisbane District Court Judge Nicole Kefford made the decision after a juror was unable to attend court for the second and third days of the trial of Nicholas Frederick Lloyd.

Lloyd had pleaded not guilty to indecently dealing with a child under 16, who was in his care at Brisbane Boys College at Toowong in the 1990s.

Discharging the jury today, Judge Kefford told the jurors there was also an issue about witness availability.

Crown prosecutor Toby Corsbie had closed the Crown case on Tuesday, after the alleged victim, his mother, two former BBC students, a former principal and a police officer had given evidence.

The trial did not go ahead on Wednesday, the second day, because of a sick juror.

Judge Kefford adjourned the case until May 15, for discussion about a new trial date

RETRIEVED https://amp.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/crime-and-justice/jury-discharged-in-trial-of-former-brisbane-boys-college-teacher-charged-with-indecent-treatment/news-story/1e04caa9dc2eeb6a0e6383934b5dcd06
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Former teacher facing indecent treatment trial

One of BBC’s previous Staff (Nick Lloyd) today began being confronted by Court Charges. The Courier Mail had published this Article, which we hope to re-publish ASAP. The dramatic boosts in our recent Visitors had indicated searches for “Nick Lloyd” & various other BBC Teachers. These Stats should be included in future eNews.

Sudden surge in Blog visitors!

While we are quietly confident at some reasons for the sudden jump to around 600 visitors, each & everyone of you are welcome to ask any questions, post any comments & piece together how you may want your location layer out.

We are planning an update to this site, in the near future. Your rapid visit, may be the motivation needed!

What Are Support Groups for Anxiety? (2/2)

IN THIS ARTICLE


What a Group is like

Finding the right Group

What to consider


How many people are in the group? A large gathering means you get to hear from more people. A small one can give you more time to work through your own feelings. A psychologist or another therapist can help you decide which size suits your needs.

Do all the members have anxiety? There are lots of different kinds of support groups. They often work best when most of the members have similar issues.

What are the rules for sharing in this group? A therapist won’t share anything you say to her. Group members aren’t supposed to, either. Ground rules about keeping what’s shared during therapy confidential can help the members build trust with each other.

What to Consider

One of the biggest advantages is that you’ll get support from other people who feel like you do. That can improve your mood and make you feel less alone.

Other people who have started to treat their anxiety may inspire you. You might pick up tips or techniques that help you deal with your own situation.

Helping problem-solve for your fellow group members can also remind you that you know a lot about managing anxiety. That can prompt you to use those skills in your own life. And group therapy is often less expensive than individual counseling.

There can be drawbacks, though. If one person doesn’t want to open up to the group, others may hesitate to share their thoughts. That can make sessions less effective.

While you may get helpful ideas from other members, don’t take their opinions and comments more seriously than the therapist who is leading the group.

If you have concerns about how your group is going, you may want to privately talk to the therapist who leads it to see if they can change how things are done. Or you may want to try another group or one-on-one therapy.

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari, MD on January 16, 2018

© 2018 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.

SOURCES

American Psychological Association: “Psychotherapy: Understanding Group Therapy.” 

Anxiety and Depression Association of America: “Support Groups.” 

Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience: “Cognitive behavioral group therapy for anxiety: recent developments.”

National Health Service (NHS) U.K.: “Depression Support Groups.”

BJPsych Advances: “Group cognitive-behavioural therapy for anxiety and depression.”

American Addiction Centers: “Group Therapy Vs. Individual Therapy.” 


RETRIEVED: The Benefits of Support Group Therapy

What Are Support Groups for Anxiety? (1/2)

IN THIS ARTICLE


What a Group is Like

Finding the Right Group

What to Consider


Anxiety can make you feel like you’re all alone in your fears. But many people live with this condition every day. Hearing from others who know what it’s like can make you feel less isolated and help you find new ways to deal with nervous feelings. Group therapy is one way to make those connections as part of your treatment.

What a Group Is Like

Group therapy usually includes five to 15 people with a common issue — in this case, anxiety — who meet, usually every week for an hour or so. Yours might be for people with all types of anxiety or for specific types, such as social phobia. Most groups are held in person in a space like a community center or hospital. Others meet online.

A trained therapist will lead the sessions. Your therapist will talk to you and the group and make suggestions about dealing with anxiety. You’ll also talk with other members of the group, who share their experiences and may make suggestions to each other. The goal is to learn about yourself and find new ways to ease your anxious feelings. You might improve your relationships with others, feel more connected, and be more satisfied with your life, too.

Groups that focus on anxiety often use cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). In CBT, a therapist helps you identify negative thoughts (including anxious ones) and replace them with healthier, more realistic ones. Some sessions may include outings or social events.

You may decide to see a therapist on your own and also go to a group, along with using other treatments for anxiety, such as medication.

Finding the Right Group

Before you join, it can help to ask the organizer or therapist running the group these questions:

Is this group open or closed? Can people join at any time, or does everyone begin together and meet for a set period of time (for example, 12 weeks)? Starting together as a closed group may help you get to know the members better, making for good, productive conversations. But with an open group, you can start therapy right away instead of waiting for the next open session.

1 of 2 (Cont.)

RETRIEVED https://www.webmd.com/anxiety-panic/guide/anxiety-support-group#1

16 ‘Hidden’ Habits of People Who Experienced Child Abuse | The Mighty

Juliette Virzi  •  FollowOctober 31, 2018

It has been said that “no one escapes childhood unscathed.” But sayings like these can have an especially significant meaning for a person who was abused as a child. Unfortunately the effects of childhood abuse don’t usually stay confined to childhood — they often reach into our experience of adulthood.

Maybe your experience growing up with abuse left you with a steady internal monologue of not good enough, not good enough, not good enough whenever you try to accomplish a task. Maybe the only way you can fall asleep is if you rock yourself to sleep — literally rocking back and forth on your bed. Or maybe you experience intense internal shame that no one sees behind the smile you plaster on your face every day.

We wanted to know what “hidden” habits people who were abused as kids have now as adults, so we asked our Mighty community to share their experiences with us.

No matter what your experience of childhood abuse was, it is important to remember you are never alone and there is help available. If you need support right now, reach the Crisis Text Line by texting “START” to 741741.

Here’s what our community had to say:

1. Rocking Back and Forth Before Going to Sleep

“I rock myself back and forth to sleep every night. I can’t stop myself from doing it unless I concentrate really hard.” — Vade M.

“I sleep in [the] fetal position every night. I rock back and forth when I get too emotional. I run at any sign of yelling or raising of the voice. When someone cusses at me, I get defensive and angry.” — Leo G.

2. Hiding Food

“I hide food. It sounds ridiculous but I have random stashes of canned food spread throughout my house in the most ridiculous places. I always got shamed for being hungry and fighting for food was commonplace in my house because my parents thought a dinner meant for two people could feed their two growing kids as well as themselves. If I didn’t get much dinner to eat then, ‘Oh well, better luck next time.’ So when I got a little older, I got smarter about stockpiling cans of tuna and soup to eat with the money I made from walking other people’s dogs. It wasn’t too bad then, but it’s still prevalent in my life 14 years later whenever I go grocery shopping.” — Ai L.

3. Engaging in Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors

“Biting and chewing at the inside of my cheek until it bleeds. I’ve also developed a bad habit of picking until I create holes in my feet.” — Patience A.

“I shake my leg and/or fidget with my skin, sometimes causing small sores.” — Princess K.

4. Carrying a “Grounding” Object

“I carry a special pillowcase with me wherever I go. It’s my security blanket. I can’t go anywhere without it. I will play with seams with it in my purse and it’s weird that my hand hangs out in my purse all the time but it’s how I handle my anxiety and my flashbacks and just life.” — Kimberly L.

5. Always Having a Secret “Escape Plan”

“I have a really hard time with people walking up behind me. I always have to have an escape plan, and I hate being cornered or my movement restricted in any way. I was chased and cornered a lot as a child, so it’s very triggering. I also struggle with physical contact, especially when I don’t initiate it.” — Shalene R.

“I always know where every exit and possible hiding place is in a room. It’s the first thing I look for in a new place.” — Jenn S.

6. Having Imaginary Friends

“I’m 37 years old with six imaginary friends. One is a comforting mother to me, and three are parts of little girl me at different traumas in my life that I comfort, as if someone was comforting me during those traumas.” — T B.

7. Not Eating Around Others

“Not eating much when I’m around people, then sneaking and stealing food later. One parent was lenient with what I ate so the other one made up for it by trying to ‘keep me healthy.’ Doesn’t help that the first one was always trying to lose weight and not hiding it.” — Sadie B.

8. Sleeping With a Flashlight

“I sleep with a flashlight always on my bed or constantly in reach of my bed ( so I can see what’s coming if I hear any noise or footsteps). I’ve been doing this since I was 3 years old and never felt safe.” — Linda C.

9. Lying

“I was taught as a child to lie. I was forced to lie to cover my abuser, I was forced to lie by my mother to cover the fact that she didn’t protect me, I was forced to lie by my school system because they didn’t zero in on the fact I was being signed out by my abuser once a week so he could abuse me on his schedule. As an adult, I feel compelled to lie to protect people I shouldn’t have to. It’s an everlasting revolving door.” — Jammie G.

10. Having a Complicated Relationship With Sex

“I started to believe I was only an object. I let people use me because I thought that was what I was supposed to do — especially men. I felt I was supposed to have sex when they wanted to, not when I was ready.” — Maria M.

“I get shameful and feel dirty if I enjoy sex.” — Debbie C.

“[I] couldn’t say no to sexually pleasing others, even if I didn’t want it.” — Miranda D.

11. Feeling Responsible for Other People’s Feelings

“I often feel responsible for how other people feel. I feel guilty when others feel bad, even when the situation has nothing to do with me. I sacrifice my own needs in order to make others feel good.” — Kaitlyn L.

“I feel responsible for other’s feelings and their state in life. Like it’s my responsibility alone to make sure their bills are paid etc. I also adopt animals, and most recently learned that it’s probably because animals don’t withhold affection when they are ‘upset’ with you.” — Summer S.

12. Being Unable to Fully Relax

“I am hyper-aware of my surroundings and find it hard to relax and just be. Sometimes I find myself in a fight-or-flight mode, even if I know I’m safe.” — Anthea V.

13. Never Asking for Help

“I’m too afraid to tell people what’s wrong or ask for help. The first time I went to my mother about an issue (I was being bullied in school), she told me to deal with it myself. As a result, I’ve just allowed things to build up because I’m so afraid I’ll be rejected, that I may as well keep it to myself.” — Veronica S.

14. Being Hypervigilant

“I’m hypervigilant. Physical touch isn’t something I do easily, [and I’m] always looking for exits. I size people up, look for physical vulnerability, [have] strong boundaries [and] over-protect my children. That translates to an overly ‘hermitty’ existence, but I’m not complaining.” —Yoli T.

“Hypervigilance 24/7. It’s helped in some of the jobs I’ve had where you need to be on alert, to mask the true source of my hypervigilance. Being overwhelmed and exhausted and needing time to recharge my batteries after going out with friends. I love to be around people, like going to concerts and stuff, but it takes a few days for me to recover from the sensory overload. Insomnia I’ve learned to just accept is part of my life now.” — Jason T.

15. Pushing People Away

“I push people away when they get close to me. I push people away when I get in fights with people. I am reactive. Negative self-talk. I feel guilty a lot.” — Ryan C.

16. Reminding Yourself You Deserve to Live

“When I’m alone I tell myself I deserve to live, that I deserve to be happy. It’s a struggle every day. I still have suicidal thoughts sometimes, but thankfully I have the most supportive group of people around me who love me. Without them I don’t know where I would be.” — Ginna B.

RETRIEVED https://themighty.com/2018/10/hidden-habits-child-abuse/

No more silence: It’s never too late to start healing

This video started with a conversation. In fact, it started with many private and professional conversations with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men who have been sexually abused about how difficult it was to speak about what happened to them as a child, about how their lives and relationships had been negatively impacted and about how isolated and alone they felt. The Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse has highlighted this over representation and sexual abuse of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children within government, community and church run institutions and the difficulties they face in being heard and accessing support.

YOUTUBE Living Well: No More Silence Healing from Sexual Abuse

Anthony Newcastle, Gordon Glenbar and I were discussing how to reach out and offer further support and encouragement to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men who have been sexually abused in childhood. Many of these men have said they will never speak publicly about what was done to them, they have said how difficult it is to access support, how they do not know who to trust and how they are unsure if healing is even possible. These men have also said how important the connection to community and country is for them and how the encouragement and support of fellow community members is particularly meaningful and important for them. —Gary Foster, Living Well.

A starting conversation with Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander men

by Anthony Newcastle, Natjul.com.
In late 2015, I met with Gordon Glenbar, an Aboriginal man working as a special projects officer for Link Up, supporting community members to engage with the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, and Gary Foster from Anglicare: Living Well Service who works with men who had been sexually abused in childhood. Gordon and I have known each other a long time. We’ve always talked about our community, about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and about the ongoing challenges our communities face confronting the negative impacts of colonisation and resulting inter-generational traumas.

Gordon, Gary and I spoke together of how to raise awareness and offer support to Aboriginal and Torres Strait men who have been sexually abused in childhood. We spoke of how individuals, families and communities are so often struggling to cope and live life in the present that the subject of helping men sexually abused as children is not talked about. We discussed how difficult it was to raise this subject, how the men themselves struggled to talk about it. We acknowledged the importance of qualified and connected individuals and organisations to lead discussions and negotiate community workshops and the extensive work done by many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in addressing sexual violence. We also discussed how important it was for local Aboriginal men to take responsibility to start supportive conversations with Aboriginal men and their communities about this issue.

The didgeridoo group

Every second Sunday I run ‘Didgeri’ at an inner city park in Brisbane. Didgeri is an Aboriginal men’s didgeridoo group. Didgeri has between 9 and 15 men. Didgeri is a place or gathering where we as Aboriginal men can come along and learn the didgeridoo as a way to connect or re-connect with culture and heritage. It is also a place where we talk about community, identity, culture, about raising kids, dealing with anger, about family and about being a good dad or husband.

All the men who come along know they are welcome to bring a son or nephew, grand-son or friend. Didgeri is a place where Aboriginal men can build and enrich connection. No alcohol or drugs, no carry on or yukai. The boys and young men are encouraged to show respect to older men, to each other and to the purpose of the gathering. At times wives, mothers or grand-mothers do come along. They generally come to drop off family and say hello, but they don’t stay as part of Didgeri.

It was at Didgeri that I raised the idea of the men putting their voices to supporting men who had been sexually abused as children and now living with the consequences. We discussed the idea of us, as every day community members acting to help raise awareness and offer support.

The discussions at Didgeri

On a couple of occasions I found myself standing with three or four other men, all leaning on our didgeridoos talking about what to do about this, and how to support the men and families who suffer as a result of this issue. We talked about community and organisational responses to women who have been sexually abused, and of the advocacy groups, which so rightly wrap around these. None of us could think of a group or advocacy organisation established for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men who were sexually abused as boys.

Anthony and Gordon.

We talked about taboos and silences within the community. The idea of creating a video that makes a public statement addressing this issue started to sound important. It would be an expression of solidarity and support, by community members, for community members. It would be a way to start a conversation.

There was some talk about approaching well known footballers to see if they would like to participate. I’m happy now that talk lasted about 10 minutes before we moved on. Real happy. We had some quiet respectful discussion about who would be involved, we did not want the message being misunderstood, or not responded to, because we included men facing domestic violence charges or public nuisance charges. What was significant here was that ‘we as men’ from the community were talking about supporting men who had suffered sexual abuse as boys and young men – something we had not discussed before.

We talked about how men struggled, how many had attempted suicide, some dying. We talked about the guilt and pain many men carry about not being able to protect their friends, brothers and sisters from the abuser when they were children.

What became part of our discussions, is that by putting our voices and our images to this, we are giving voice to something that is almost silent, something almost invisible. We are saying silence is no longer OK. We want to lend our voices to acknowledge this as a challenge in the lives of men in our community. We very much wanted to offer support to families that are falling apart, where wives and children are seeing their husband and fathers become changed men because the demons from the past visit them late at night and torment them during their day.

We talked about how men found it difficult to talk with their families about why they are coming apart at the seams. Even though these men love their families dearly and would die without them, the taboo around this issue means it is difficult to speak about. Men do what men too often do. Push it down, ignore it, drink your way through it, yell at it, yell at others, feel ashamed, feel responsible, feel judged, feel alone, blame yourself, but don’t talk about it. As one man said:

“How the bloody hell do you talk about it anyway, and to whom?”

Doing something

We want to find ways to talk about sexual abuse of males that invite participation. We want to communicate this in a way that invites empathy, understanding and respect, and says no more. Over the weeks we discussed how, if people aren’t talking about it, then nothing is being done. Some of our discussions had long pauses, or some changing of subject, before resuming. Some men stood in silence. We concluded that if nothing is being done about it and our brothers and our sisters lives are falling apart because of it, let’s do something.

We wanted to address the isolation and silence. We wanted to say,

“We know this happened to you and we are sorry it did. We want you to know that you are still our brother.”

We want to help address the fear of being judged and the feelings of shame. The shame is not yours to carry.

We talked about the importance of speaking, not just to men who have been sexually victimised, but to men and women across our communities.

Over the following weeks I rang, met with, and talked to about 20 people. All of the Didgeri group wanted to participate in some way. There were men who said straight away, “Yes, I want to support that and I will say it to camera.” Some said that they really wanted to offer support in some way, but because of family, work or how their involvement might be seen, they couldn’t be part of the video at present. There were men who said that although they felt for the fellas, they didn’t know if they could do it, as any talk of sexual abuse of children was hard for them to be around. Those who did not appear on camera, shook our hands and said, “Good on you for doing this.”

Making the video

Eleven of us gathered in a studio at the 4BE Multi-cultural radio station at Kangaroo Point to record our bits. We decided that in the room we would have only the person speaking to camera, the camera operator and myself, in order to help people relax and feel comfortable. We wanted to remove any shame-job. But with eleven Aboriginal people together in the waiting room, among the chats and yarns, people talking about who their mob were, and where their people are from, as always, family reconnections were found. “Hey, your mob from Roma? Your uncle is George from that cattle station? That’s my uncle too, that’s my tribe, we cousins.”

As people felt more comfortable with each other, as personal connections were made and a feeling of being in this together came over the group, then people started pairing up, saying, “Do you mind if I do it with Wayne, because he my cousin and we never met before.”

Others would say things like, “Brother, I never done anything like this before, can you sit with me and do one together?”

Before we knew it everyone was in the room supporting each other with comments like, “Oh that sounded deadly (really good) what you said then sis.” Or, “You two fellas look and sound good there when you said that.”

Ownership had shifted. Now the participants were making suggestions and talking about how good a project this was to be involved with.

It was on this day in the studio that some of participants spoke of how personal this was for them, their families and community. This issue impacted on members of the Didgeri and had not been discussed before that day. The gathering became an opportunity to talk and make a difference. The mood in the room changed, embracing connection, listening, caring, sharing and laughing together, offering support and genuine regard.

Talk turned to, “When this being released, we going to get to see it before?” and, “Do you think we can do another one?”

Six weeks later

It is now NAIDOC week and this Sunday afternoon we will have a first public showing of the video on a big screen at the Musgrave Park Cultural Centre in South Brisbane, where the guests of honour are the eleven people who participated, their families and friends. Over the weeks I have been constantly asked by those involved about when everyone gets to see the video.

This Sunday many of our Didgeri group will bring their didgeridoos and we will have our didgeridoo lesson aside before the video showing. My wife is making sandwiches, a curry and rice and some finger food. Gordon has been a constant source of encouragement and Gary has had almost boundless energy to keep pace, to bring this project together.

Now only days from the launch of our video I think about our first meetings (Gary, Gordon and I). I think of how appreciative I am of those individuals and organisations who work to address sexual violence and its impacts on our communities. I am however, particularly pleased that this project and these discussions happened in and amongst a group many would call grass roots. I am pleased that Aboriginal men and women stepped forward and put their face and voice to raising awareness and generating discussion that offers support to men who have been sexually abused in childhood, as well as their families. Community taking action and responsibility for community.

I was reminded of a discussion about suicide prevention and response I had with a 72 year old Aboriginal man on a remote Cape York community some years ago. When I asked him, “What can we do about this lack of counsellors and social workers and psychologists who can support people in remote places like this?” The old man said:

“When someone is finding it hard to live, we all know they might be finding it hard to live because we are a small town. Sometimes the best thing you can do for somebody else is go and see them, and sit on their porch and sit down and have a cup of tea with them. Even if you don’t know what to say about that thing that is a problem for them, you can still have a cup of tea with them. And they will know.”

–Anthony Newcastle, Natjul.com

A big thank you

We wish to express our appreciation to the men and women who have supported the development of the No More Silence: It’s Never Too Late to Start Healing video. This video reflects the power of everyday community members to make a difference.

Profound impacts

We are only too aware of the profound impacts child sexual abuse can have on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander boys and men, girls and women and their communities:

  • Isolation, feeling alone and different.
  • Guilt, shame, self blame, distrust.
  • Feeling overwhelmed, hurt, angry, not good enough.
  • Disconnection from family, community and country.
  • Mental health problem, depression, anxiety.
  • Flashbacks, nightmares, sleep problems.
  • Suicide, self harm.
  • Relationship and sexual difficulties.
  • Drink and drug abuse.
  • Involvement with police and criminal justice system, prison.
  • Physical health problems.

Barriers to speaking

Men sexually abused in childhood report multiple barriers to speaking about what happened and accessing support:

  • Fear he won’t be believed or will be judged.
  • Sense of shame.
  • Concern his sexuality or manhood will be questioned.
  • Worry he will be seen as less of a man or people might think he will go on to abuse.
  • Distrust of authority, police, of anyone.
  • Fear of being blamed or that he will face payback for speaking up.
  • Worry that he will fall apart if he starts talking.
  • Being told to keep quiet that the community is not ready to talk about this.
  • Wanting to protect family members and others who were abused.
  • Having no-one to talk with.
  • Pressure from the abuser and others to keep the silence.

As well as hearing how difficult it is for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men to speak about childhood sexual abuse, we hear that the pressure not to talk increases the sense of isolation, and makes it difficult to get the help they deserve.

A conversation starter

The video is designed as a conversation starter. Sharing the video is one way for community members to raise awareness and offer support, encouragement and hope to those who have been sexually abused in childhood. It sends a message to all those who have been sexually abused or sexually assaulted across Queensland and throughout Australia to say:

You’re not responsible for what happened to you as a child.
You are not alone.
We care.
The blame is not yours to carry.
The shame is not yours to carry.
Keep talking until you get the help you deserve.
Take care of yourself, you’re worth it.
It’s never too late to start healing.

A developing conversation

Our hope is now to continue to develop this conversation and further improve responses to those who have been sexually abused.This ‘No more silence: It’s never too late to start healing’ video is part of a collection of resources developed in partnership with the Brisbane Didgeri Group and Natjul Performing Arts. Other videos in this series are ‘No straight lines: We all benefit from maps of life’s territories’ and ‘Support: Contributions to healing.’

Further information and support

If you are a man who has been sexually abused, or someone who cares about him, and you want more information and support. Check out the many support articles we have on the website:

Additional support

As well as the Living Well resources you can find more information and support by contacting the below services.

Crisis services

MensLine Australia
Website: mensline.org.au
A national telephone and online support, information and referral service for men with family and relationship concerns.
Phone 1300 78 99 78 (available 24/7)
Online counselling: https://mensline.org.au/want-to-talk/

Statewide Sexual Assault Helpline
Website: health.qld.gov.au/sexualassault
Lists a range of support services across QLD.
Phone: 1800 010 120

1800 Respect
Website: 1800respect.org.au
24/7 telephone and online crisis counselling, information and referral for anyone in Australia who has experienced or been impacted by sexual assault, domestic or family violence. Staffed by trauma specialist counsellors.
Phone: 1800 737 732
Online Counselling: 1800respect.org.au/telephone-and-online-counselling

Lifeline
Website: lifeline.org.au
24 hour crisis support and suicide prevention.
Phone: 131 114

Specialist services

Link Up (QLD) Aboriginal Corporation
Website: link-upqld.org.au
Provides counselling, healing and culturally appropriate support for indigenous Australians.
Phone: 1800 200 855

Healing Foundation
Website: healingfoundation.org.au
The Healing Foundation is a national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisation with a focus on building culturally strong, community led healing solutions.
Phone: 02 6272 7500

Micah Projects Inc / Lotus Place (Find and Connect QLD)
Website: lotusplace.org.au
Support and resource service for Forgotten Australians and former child migrants.
Phone: 1800 161 109
Email: lotus@micahprojects.org.au

Relationships Australia QLD
Website: raq.org.au
Family, children and relationship counselling. Relationship Australia are committed to offering the best possible counselling, mediation, education and support services in a professional, relaxed and confidential environment.
Phone: 07 3423 6890
Phone: 1800 552 127
Government Funded

Bravehearts
Website: bravehearts.org.au
Specialist case management, counselling and telephone counselling for child and adult survivors, non-offending family members and friends. Services include counselling, support engaging with the Royal Commission, preparation of written statements, attending private sessions and public hearings.
Phone: 1800 272 831 (8am – 8pm AEST/AEDT, weekdays)
Email: rc@bravehearts.org.au

Blue Knot Foundation
Website: blueknot.org.au
(Formerly Adults Surviving Child Abuse – ASCA). National professional phone counselling, information and support for adult survivors of child abuse with referral database of experienced professionals and agencies. Provides workshops for survivors, family members, partners and friends. Professional development for health professionals is also available.
Phone: 1300 657 380 (9am-5pm AEST/AEDT 7 days)
Email: helpline@blueknot.org.au

Murrigunyah
Website: murrigunyah.org.au
Murrigunyah Family & Cultural Healing Centre is a community based sexual assault support service run by Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander women of Logan City.
Phone: (07) 3290 4254
Email: admin@murrigunyah.org.au

Additional info

BeyondBlue has programs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and general information on mental health, including how to recognise depression and where to get help. Phone 1300 22 4636

Lifeline’s Mental Health Resource Centre offers Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People specific resources. Download PDF files on:

Your local hospital or doctor may be able to help you with counselling and support.

Social and Emotional Wellbeing and Mental Health Services in Aboriginal Australia allows you to search a map to find Indigenous-specific mental health services across Australia.

Have a yarn

Have a yarn with:

Other mental health support services to talk about your feelings and get help.

Indigenous family support and healing groups and others in your mob to try to help reduce the stress of raising children.

Community health services

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Health Service (ATSICHS)
Call the ATSICHS Healing Centre on (07) 3240 8907 to access culturally appropriate counselling services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Brisbane affected by mental illness.

Townsville Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Services (TAIHS)
The TAIHS Social and Mental Health Unit offers mental health counsellors and run regular men’s and women’s groups to help cope with:

  • Mental illness.
  • Family business.
  • Prison and court matters.

Phone TAIHS on (07) 4759 4022 to book a counselling session or join a group.

Palm Island Mental Health Service
At the Palm Island Mental Health Service Indigenous health workers support people with mental health issues in the local community.

Other remote support
Mental health support and counselling services are also available in these remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities:

  • Burketown
  • Doomadgee
  • Gregory Downs
  • Karumba
  • Mornington Island
  • Normanton
  • Thursday Island

For more information phone the Vincent Campus – Cambridge Street Facility on (07) 4775 8100.

RETRIEVED https://www.livingwell.org.au/get-support/aboriginal-%20support-sexual-abuse/

Knight only Public Predator?!

Resulting from Public Information available, there is great reluctance to have some of the Core recommendations of the CARC Final Report actioned (put into effect). From the Final Report’s Preface, the following topic grabbed many Survivours’ attention: ‘Why have some institutions not protected children?‘ Of particular interest is that some of these situations continue”:

I have never really been able to come to terms with was the part society played – or didn’t play, I guess, being the point.
Face Screaming in Fear

All institutions should prevent, identify and mitigate risks. An appropriate response should also be made, whenever CSA occurs. Thankfully, BBC’s PMSA is among the schools that have clearly outlined stages and processes, whenever anything occurs involving current students (Policies & Strategies). Of particular relevance is the PMSA Historical Abuse Redress Policy, which relates to official stages including (Procedure; Report and resolution; and Care strategy).

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A PDF of the latest PMSA Historical Abuse Redress Policyis available from https://www.pmsa-schools.edu.au/library/files/PMSA%20Historical%20Abuse%20Redress%20Policy%281%29.pdf

Under current Qld Laws, CSA Survivours may be limited to not being able to mention the monetary figures of Private Damages Claims, yet they are able to simply help others by letting them know they are not alone!

Kasurs child sex abuse victims struggle to rebuild their lives

Sound familiar? Great to read on of another’s coping with CSA!



HUSSAIN WALA: “I don’t regret speaking out, but since then, people have looked at me with strange eyes,” laments a 16-year-old Ahmed*.

He was one of 20 children sexually abused by a gang who sold videos of the acts and used them for blackmail purposes.

The police, who had conspicuously failed to act despite pleas from some parents, eventually arrested 37 men after clashes between relatives and authorities brought the issue into the media spotlight last summer, years after the abuse began.

Six months after one of the country’s biggest paedophilia abuse case broke, police now confirm 17 of the accused remain in prison awaiting trial, while three more are out on bail.

Read: Kasur child molestation case baseless, says inquiry report

This photograph taken on November 20, 2015, shows Hussain Khan Wala village in Punjab province, the scene of one of Pakistan’s worst child abuse cases. — AFP

But the young victims who defied taboos to seek justice say they have little hope for rebuilding their lives.

In recent years, more and more families in Pakistan have dared to speak out against sexual abuse of their children.

But the fight against predators remains in its infancy. 

Powerful taboos, gaps in legislation and a lack of awareness continue to fuel a phenomenon that remains hidden, yet deeply embedded within society.

Media glare

Ahmed drags his feet listlessly in the narrow winding streets of Hussain Khan Wala, a large village in rural Punjab. 

Like the other abused teens, he feels stigmatised and without any kind of support after five years of abuse.

“I feel terrible when my friends stare at me. I know what they are thinking,” he mutters. “My classmates and teachers look down on me, so I stopped going to school.”

Also read: Kasur sex abuse ─ ‘I thought of killing myself everyday’

Though the case finally made it to the national news media in July, the local police were found to have turned a blind eye to the crimes for several months “which amounts not only to criminal negligence, rather it was connivance”, according to a report by the National Commission for Human Rights.

Several of the accused belong to locally influential families.

It took a series of clashes between the victims’ families and police, in which dozens were injured, for politicians to act and demand arrests.

The families and victims were then served up to the media, with some local leaders placing the number of abused children at 280 — though that figure is believed to have been inflated as a result of attempts to leverage the tragedy for business and political gain.

Explore: Kasur child abuse case ‘not organised crime’

Authorities established that 20 youths were raped and sodomised, the only two sex crimes recognised under Pakistani law.

The country’s penal code does not prohibit sexual abuse that does not involve penetration, nor child pornography.

“This case shows there are no institutional structures to tackle sexual abuse or to protect children,” says Valerie Khan, the director of Group Development Pakistan, a local NGO which advocates legal reforms.

A law criminalising sexual abuse of children is currently being debated by Pakistan’s Senate.

These reforms are all the more urgent given the growing number of cases being reported, according to child rights’ group Sahil, which records statistics based on press reports in the absence of official data.

The group recorded fewer than 2,000 cases in 2008, but more than 3,500 in 2014, a rise it said “reflects an increase in social awareness of the problem”.

Post-Kasur: This project helps people break silence over child sexual abuse

Veteran human rights activist Hina Jilani said that while increased reporting was welcome, cases must be handled sensitively — noting that activists, judges and police were not trained in how to question child victims.

Another obstacle to greater reporting of crimes are the families themselves, who are often reluctant to intervene when they feel their “honour” is at stake, according to Jilani.

‘They should be sent away’

Eighteen-year-old Sara* says it was unreported childhood abuse, and the subsequent loss of her honour that drove her toward prostitution.

Forced to abandon her studies to work following the death of her father at the age of 16, she found herself at the mercy of an employer who she says raped her.

“If I would tell my family, they would not go to the police station,” says the frail young woman, because of the shame it would bring.

Read: Accused says children abused in his presence

It was difficult for her to make her complaint herself because “there (are) no lady police” at the station, she said, and she quit her job fearing more attacks.

Having lost her sense of worth, she turned to an intermediary at a beauty salon who guided her toward prostitution, which she now uses to support her family.

Wearing light make-up and modern but modest clothing, she has all the airs of a carefree high-schooler — apart from the fact she walks the streets alone at night.

Back in Hussain Khan Wala, the parents of abused children are waiting for the government to help them rebuild their lives anew elsewhere.

Hasan*, a labourer whose 17 year old son was among those abused, said “(They) should be sent to Islamabad or abroad because they can not study here, you must remove them from the atmosphere.”

─ *Names have been changed to protect identities of victims.

RETRIEVED https://www.dawn.com/news/1233985