3 – Types of Child Abuse

Child Abuse Investigation Field Guide

Child Abuse Investigation Field Guide

2015, Pages 15-55

Child Abuse Investigation Field Guide

Author links open overlay panelD’Michelle P.DuPreM.D.JerriSitesM.A.Show morehttps://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-802327-3.00003-5Get rights and content

Abstract

This chapter discusses major categories of child abuse: physical abuse, physical neglect, emotional or mental abuse, and sexual abuse and includes signs, symptoms, and behavioral indicators of abuse. The chapter also discusses child sexual exploitation and trafficking and how human trafficking organizations are set up, how they retain control of the victim, and indicators of trafficking for law enforcement and child protective services workers. Investigation techniques for law enforcement are included. Child fatalities, sudden infant death syndrome, and homicide are also discussed in this chapter.

Description

Children are suffering from a hidden epidemic of child abuse and neglect. Every year more than 3 million reports of child abuse are made in the United States involving more than 6 million children. The United States has one of the worst records among industrialized nations – losing on average between four and seven children every day to child abuse and neglect. The WHO reports that over 40 million children, below the age of 15, are subjected to child abuse each year. Domestic violence in the home increases that risk threefold.  

Child Abuse Investigation Field Guide is intended to be a resource for anyone working with cases involving abuse, neglect or sexual assault of children. It is designed to be a quick reference and focuses on the best practices to use during a child abuse investigation. The guide explains the Minimal Facts Interview, the Forensic Interview, and the entire process from report to court. It is understood that every state has different statutes regarding these topics; however the objectives of recognizing, reporting, and investigating cases of this nature are the same. Just as every crime scene is different, every case involving a child is different. Best practices and standard procedures exist to help ensure cases are discovered, reported and investigated properly, to ensure good documentation is obtained to achieve prosecution and conviction. This field guide will be a useful tool for law enforcement, child protective services, social service caseworkers, child advocates, and other personnel and agencies working for the welfare of children.

Key Features

  • Includes protocols and best practices for child abuse investigations
  • Explains the Multidisciplinary Team approach and why it is useful
  • Describes the Minimal Facts Interview and the Forensic Interview
  • Walks the reader from the initial report, through the investigation process, to pre-trial  preparation and provides tips on court testimony
  • Portable and affordable, the guide is tabbed for easy access of specific information while in the  field and can ensure that team members are “on the same page” throughout the investigation 

Keywords

Child abuse, Child neglect, Child sexual exploitation, Emotional abuse, Human smuggling, Human trafficking, Physical abuse, Sexual abuse

Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


RETRIEVED https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780128023273000035

NRS – Submission Update

To each of our RCbbc Blog Readers who have-are-will submit an NRS Submission, it pleases me that I’m reaching a point in my Submission Drafting that my Counsellor & I will soon send it off to another agency. This may sound complex, yet it’s what a fair amount of the CSA Surviving-Victims require.

Although I had earlier been in contact with some of these same offices previously, I was approaching things in the wrong order. I now understand why some avenues suggest a ‘top down’ mentality, yet for the rest of us we’re happier with a ‘grassroots’ approach.

Grassroots VS Top-down

National Redress Scheme Newsletter


This newsletter gives an update on the National Redress Scheme (the Scheme). It covers institution updates and recent data.

The update contains material that could be confronting or distressing. Sometimes words or images can cause sadness or distress or trigger traumatic memories, particularly for people who have experienced past abuse or childhood trauma. 

Support is available to help you if you need it. To find out more, go to www.nationalredress.gov.au/support.

If you need immediate support, 24-hour telephone assistance is available through:


Institutions update

All institutions where the sexual abuse of children occurred must be accountable for that abuse and join the Scheme without delay.

Under new arrangements announced in April 2020, institutions have until 31 December 2020 to join the Scheme. The extended timeframe recognises the changed capacity of some institutions during the coronavirus pandemic.

To provide some certainty to applicants, any institution named in the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse and/or an application were asked to provide a written statement outlining their intention to join the Scheme by 30 June 2020.

On 1 July 2020, the details of institutions that signified, and failed to signify their intent to join before the deadline were published on the Scheme website. Minister for Families and Social Services, Senator the Hon Anne Ruston also issued a media release on the naming of institutions.

To find out more, go to www.nationalredress.gov.au/institutions.


Application progress as at 26 June 2020

As of 26 June 2020, the Scheme:

  • had received 7,261 applications
  • had made 3358 decisions, including 2,693 payments totaling approximately $220.9 million
  • had made 612 offers of redress, which are currently with applicants to consider
  • was processing 3,358 applications.

Find out more

To find out more about the Scheme, go to www.nationalredress.gov.au or call 1800 737 377 from Australia or +61 3 6222 3455 from overseas.


National Redress Scheme Newsletter

This newsletter provides information on the National Redress Scheme (the Scheme). It covers updated arrangements during the Coronavirus pandemic and recent data.

This newsletter contains material that could be confronting or distressing. Sometimes words or images can cause sadness or distress or trigger traumatic memories, particularly for people who have experienced past abuse or childhood trauma.
Support is available to help you if you need it. To find out more, go to www.nationalredress.gov.au/support.

If you need immediate support, 24-hour telephone assistance is available through:

Application progress as at 29 May 2020

As a result of improvements to the Scheme and an increase in Independent Decision Makers over recent months, the Scheme has been able to provide more people with a redress outcome.

From November 2019 to April 2020, the Scheme provided an average of around 260 outcomes to applicants per month. In May 2020, this has increased to around 800 outcomes. 

As of 29 May 2020, the Scheme:

  • had received 7,009 applications
  • was processing 3,648 applications
  • had made 2,907 decisions, including 2,250 payments totalling approximately over $184 million
  • had 840 applications on hold, including 525 because one or more institution named had not yet joined
  • had made 574 offers of redress, which applicants have six months to consider.

The National Redress Scheme Information Phone Line is now accepting inbound calls

During the Coronavirus pandemic, the National Redress Scheme Information Phone Line temporarily stopped receiving inbound calls and instead people were asked to leave a voicemail message so we could call them back.

As the response to the pandemic has evolved, the Scheme Information Phone Line is once again able to accept inbound calls without the need to automatically leave a voicemail message.

If you would like to discuss your redress application with someone or have any queries around the Scheme, you can call the Scheme Information Phone Line on 1800 737 377 (Monday to Friday 8am to 5pm) from Australia or on +61 6222 3455from overseas.

Updated Statutory Declaration requirements during Coronavirus

The Scheme understands that due to the Coronavirus pandemic, it may be difficult to have the Statutory Declaration for the redress application form witnessed.

In response, the Scheme can now accept and process applications where the Statutory Declaration was unable to be signed or witnessed due to Coronavirus-related restrictions or concerns. If you are unable to sign or get your Statutory Declaration witnessed due to Coronavirus-related restrictions or concerns, the Scheme can accept unsigned and unwitnessed Statutory Declarations until 31 December 2020.

You will still need to submit the Statutory Declaration form along with your application, even if it is not signed or witnessed. This applies to redress applications lodged or being processed in the period 1 March to 31 December 2020.

If you would like to discuss your redress application with someone or have any queries around the Scheme, you can call the Scheme Information Phone Line on 1800 737 377 (Monday to Friday 8am to 5pm) from Australia or on +61 6222 3455from overseas.

Find out more

To find out more about the Scheme, go to www.nationalredress.gov.au or call 1800 737 377 from Australia or +61 3 6222 3455 from overseas.Copyright © 2020 Australian Government, All rights reserved.
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Information and services during Coronavirus

Our priority continues to be the processing of applications and delivering outcomes. We are doing everything possible to process applications and are working closely with participating institutions.

If you call the National Redress Scheme Information Phone Line (1800 737 377) from Australia (call charges may apply) or +61 6222 3455 from overseas you will be able to leave a voice mail message and we will return your call as soon as possible.

The Scheme continues to accept and process applications. If you need to lodge a document, provide identity documents or have any queries regarding the National Redress Scheme, please contact the National Redress Information Phone Line on 1800 737 377 from Australia (call charges may apply) or +61 6222 3455 from overseas and leave a message.

If you need immediate support, 24-hour telephone assistance is available through:

If you need assistance with your redress application you can contact a redress support service. A list of providers is available on this website. We are aware that many providers are operating in a different manner because of the impact of Coronavirus. In most circumstances they will be able to provide assistance over the phone.

If you need information about Coronavirus and what the government is doing visit www.health.gov.au or contact the Coronavirus Health Information Line on 1800 020 080. This line operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.


RETRIEVED (BETA format) NRS site


“Brave New World” … ?!


After Australia’s July 2020 weekend of ‘Black Lives Matter’, ABC’s Afternoon Briefing had Patricia Karvelas interviewing US Prof. Goff (sp.?). For many Survivours of Child Sexual Abuse, much of these debates have carried the same passion as what we’ve felt throughout our lives. Ignorance & turning attention away from are even spoken against in the bible. School lessons. Child care. Sports practice. School camps. A pattern forming…?

Black Lives Matter

JOE MCKENDRY

News of Jeffery Epstein also forms ‘front page news’, including parts of the British Royal Family, upper levels of US & International society. At the targeted end of this game are low income, low SES (socio economic status) population & young adults/teenagers. Suitably, Australia’s Judicial System has begun to publicly deal with more allegations following 2013-17 CARC. Highest of these has been George Pell. Sound familiar…?

From the topics presented since 2013, this RoyalCommBBC.blog has aimed to republish noteworthy journalism, factually-based info & ‘the other side of the coin’ POV. We don’t claim to be a Journalistic Reference to prove legal data; it isn’t to be used as an excuse or a bet; links can be arranged with suitable portals, where need be; as are related channels, following earlier BBC involvement of later ‘guilty’ Nudgee College staff. A later post will be arranged re: queries of Overlack. Seems too surreal…?

About the Redress Board

HIA logo – https://www.hiaredressni.uk

The Historical Institutional Abuse (Northern Ireland) Act 2019 received Royal Assent on 5 November 2019. The Act provides the legal framework for the establishment of the Historical Institutional Abuse Redress Board (the Board).

Read more …