eNews : March 20

Cover image | Epstein + Saville

Dealing with paedorings / pedorings; Completing things; Further St.Kevins likeness … BBC?; Dubious BBC Staff; Viewing stats.

https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn%3Aaaid%3Ascds%3AUS%3A19c123ac-4f6f-42eb-8c33-117ca8114d95

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Shock of overlapping corruption, predators, victims, targets + SAFETY!

(Anthony) Kim Buchanan – ‘Butch’ (Brisbane Boys’ College Portal 1990)
  • Power of Preying: Why Men Target Women in the Workplace” (2017) grabbed my attention, which began to describe the insipid, predator-vulnerable attitudes of being convicted. As per the Sentencing Judge’s remarks in the case of (Anthony) Kim Buchanan – BUTCH – (image via Portal 1990): 1980-2000 offences “that can only be regarded as most serious offences of a most degrading and humiliating kind” (Judge BOTTING, 2002 Indictment);
  • Most shockingly, is that this Conviction was only able to site 30 offences. It is now being discussed and determined, whether most classes of 30 students were involved in other forms of abuses. Before Buchanan had even entered his BBC Teaching profession, moments of abuse have been identified from their adolescence. Coupled with how adjusted versions were repeated in following semesters, Butch was a prime example of what we should be aware of:
  • > grooming: befriending and establishing an emotional connection; (Jeffery Epstein, Prince Andrew & Bill Clinton) illicit businesses such as child trafficking, child prostitution, or the production of child pornography;
  • > blame-shifting: ‘devil/satan’ doing wrong, instead of ‘church-hopping’ and ‘school-swapping’ ; is a common psychological trick Narcissists and other toxic, similar, emotionally immature and ultimately toxic people use to abuse and to gaslight their victims into thinking they were not abused at all… or if they were that they somehow deserve it.
  • > victim-blaming: Blame is placing the entire responsibility for one’s unpleasant actions, consequences, and feelings on another person or external event, and insisting that others agree: ‘two sides to every story’ is frequently used to justify this habit.

When corruption and politics is drawn into the mix, truth is something that survives. Please add in any of your FEEDBACK!


Online Predators (Tandez): 1. Keeping Yourself Physically Safe : Avoid dangerous places. Be aware of your surroundings. Use the “back off” command. Take self-defense. Create obstacles to entering your home. Report suspicious activity. Contact the authorities.

How to avoid Predators

2. Being on the Lookout for Online Predators : Do not “check in” on social media. Refrain from posting personal information. Use anti-virus security. Monitor what your friends and family post.

How to avoid Predators

3. Staying Away from Emotional Predators : Watch out for a sense of entitlement. Avoid manipulation. Keep an eye out for workplace narcissists. Take it slow when dating someone new.

4. Protecting Your Kids From Predators : Recognize red flags. Monitor the people in your child’s life. Talk to your kids about abuse. Listen to kids. Practice safety skills. Teach children online safety strategies.


REFERENCES:

Katehakis, Alexandra. 2017. The Power of Preying; Why men target women in the workplace. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/sex-lies-trauma/201710/the-power-preying

Narcissists and Flying Monkeys blame shifting further traumatizes victims. (2015). Blame shifting and victim shaming is abusive behavior. https://flyingmonkeysdenied.com/2015/11/26/narcissists-flying-monkeys-blame-shifting-traumatizes-victims/

Supreme Court Sentence. (2002). Ex officio indictment. https://www.sentencing.sclqld.org.au/php/hiliter.php?run=1&url=/sentencing_remarks/2002/SR_BRIS_BuchananAK_26042002.html

Tandez, Adrian (co-authored by). (2019). How to Avoid Predators. Updated: October 10, 2019 https://www.wikihow.com/Avoid-Predators

Trinity Grammar settles sexual abuse case for $1 million


By Tammy Mills

February 1, 2020 — 4.30pm


Prestigious Melbourne school Trinity Grammar has paid out more than $1 million to a former student for the historical sexual abuse he suffered.

John Turner, abused in 1974 when he was 16 by boarding master Leslie Wiggins, said he felt vindicated.

“It makes me feel whole again. It makes me feel like a person. I never felt adequate as an adult, I always felt I was hopeless,” he said.

John Turner says he feels vindicated after a $1 million settlement with Trinity Grammar. CREDIT: SIMON SCHLUTER

“The feelings of inadequacy and extreme anxiety have been present with me my entire life since the sixth form.”

Mr Turner, now 62, was sent to Trinity as a 14-year-old, moving from Papua New Guinea where his step-father was the vice chancellor of its university.

Boarding school life in Melbourne was at first fun and full of mischief in the shadow of some of their masters who Mr Turner described as a “procession of weirdos and oddballs who came and went”.

The boys would make jokes amongst themselves when they knew they were being watched in the showers by one master, and Wiggins, the assistant school chaplain, was known to have “liked little boys.”

Wiggins targeted Mr Turner after he and his friends were caught smoking marijuana. Awaiting to hear whether he’d be expelled, Wiggins came into Mr Turner’s bedroom at night on the pretext of wanting to help him. Wiggins assaulted him twice before the teenager asked to be moved into a shared dormitory.

John Turner, pictured here when he was 15 years old.

Mr Turner told his sister, then his father found out and called a meeting with headmaster John Leppitt, who asked Mr Turner to leave the boarding house. Mr Turner didn’t fight back.

“I felt that I was saving my fellow boarders from a disastrous outcome because they’d been threatened with expulsion and I’d been told I was the ringleader. They were country boys so if they were expelled, it would have been life-long shame,” Mr Turner said.

Mr Turner left the boarding house to live with his father in Richmond, and he said he was thrown into the “abyss”. He started an arts/law degree at Monash University, and his father had plans for him to go into politics. But riddled with anxiety, he couldn’t finish the degree and lurched from job to job. He now runs his own cleaning business.

“I could never hold a job down and it’s almost a direct result of that. I would just get restless,” he said.

Mr Turner said he chose to go public in an effort to try and get in touch with his school friends, as well as a close friend from Ruyton Girls’ School who was assaulted by a Trinity master.

Leslie Wiggins, pictured in The Mitre, the Trinity Grammar year book.

“I don’t know what’s happened to them in their lives and I want them to know I was trying to protect them,” he said.

By coming forward, Mr Turner also had to disclose to his wife what had happened to him as a boy.

“It was difficult, but she has always been very supportive. She was terrific. And for her it explains a lot,” he said.

“Now that I’ve told everyone, I’m not ashamed of it.”

Wiggins was convicted in 1991 of indecently assaulting three boys on the Mornington Peninsula. He died several years ago.

Mr Turner praised the school’s current administration for their handling of his claim.

“Right from the start, they accepted responsibility,” he said.

School council chairman John Gillam said historical cases of child sex abuse has darkened Trinity’s history, but the school was committed to ensuring support and action for those affected.

“We are deeply sorry that these abuses have occurred. The school will not forget nor underestimate the impact these historical incidents have had,” Mr Gillam said.

RELATED ARTICLE Trinity Grammar knew about abuse and protected Teachewr alleged Victim says https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/trinity-grammar-knew-about-abuse-and-protected-teacher-alleged-victim-says-20170224-gukjok.html

Rightside Legal senior associate Laird Macdonald, who represented Mr Turner, said institutions are “slowly waking up to the devastating consequences of child abuse and the compensation they have to pay to deal with this dreadful legacy”.

Trinity signed up to the redress scheme in 2018 and Mr Macdonald said, had his client gone through that system, he would have received a maximum $150,000 in compensation.

The way the school dealt with Mr Turner’s claim signals a shift in a school that had struggled to grapple with historical abuse claims.

This came to a head when allegations were made against a once revered school figure, Christopher Howell, who taught at Trinity for more than 40 years.

Howell took his own life before he was due to face court on an indecent assault charge, and, even though they knew about the allegations, former headmaster Dr Michael Davies and his deputy Rohan Brown penned a tribute calling him a hero.

The tribute caused deep divides in the school, culminating with Dr Davies’ resignation in 2018. His exit from the school was not over the handling of abuse allegations, but from intense backlash for sacking Mr Brown after he cut a student’s hair. 

If this story has raised concerns for you, the following services can assist:

Lifeline: 13 11 14 lifeline.org.au

Sexual Assault Crisis Line: 1800 806 292 (free call)


RETRIEVED https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/trinity-grammar-settles-sexual-abuse-case-for-1-million-20200201-p53wty.html

“You’re not alone!”

It’s relieving to know that the figures leading into Feb 20 are that RCbbc Blog has reached 691 Subscribers + 39 Followers. To each of the viewers of our Support Group – “You’re not alone!

https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/real-life/youre-not-alone-shouldnt-feel-9597781

The honesty raised through many of these Discussions, Statements + Meetings often leads to Qld Justice being supported in their ongoing matters. Through the Sharing of related postings, local-national-global news events often reveal common patterns of CSA behaviour.

theconversation.com – international students

As ‘International Students’ began being focussed on, around Australia Day, 2020 will now have another focus of peers on. While celebrating Australia’s global reputation in foreign countries, some of these postings may reveal further angst amongst ESL (English as Second Language) families. Obviously, it’s beneficial for all when a positive outcome is made of any negative settings.

International students (part 2)

Not realising how impacting the issue of international students would be, it seems that this is a largely untapped area. Unsurprisingly, as Education appears as a high commodity in Australia’s Budget, through the handling of Students our nation has boundless incentives to be hands-on(😯?). Similar to the frequent defence of ‘no harm intended’, the amounts of information + reasons for foreign speaking Families of suspected CSA surviving Children + Students is quite astounding!

‘Foreign students’ study in Australia

From Victorian Education Dept’s Risk Assessment Template for International Students, the Events or Environments of Highest risk are:

  • Homestay host is not clear on Child Safe requirements and mandatory reporting procedure;
  • Parent of International student not clear on how to report child abuse;

This is where BBC has performed well, as to the the first item – mandatory reporting procedure. Discussions had with the PMSA confirm this, in-addition to easily viewing + Sharing copies of the related PMSA Historical Abuse Redress Policy (PDF). What does cause concern is the ongoing leaps in statistics of BBC’s previous, current and potential enrolments. This is where the second listed ‘Highest risk’ appears, in the items above. Even through discussions with BBC ‘Old Boys’ experiences in foreign countries, it appears that even reported Australian CSA occurrences are not included with other Education systems. This could be compounded in ESL predicaments, as demonstrated by particular interest in views from non-English countries.

Visitors – Jan 20

Of greatest concern, is those Students + their Families who ‘fall between the gaps’. Through providing our factual evidence, our RCbbc Shares the following link to the International Baccalaureate’s ‘Discussing child protection in international schools’ (http://blogs.ibo.org/blog/2016/04/14/discussing-child-protection-in-international-schools/). Of particular notes is that the key topics of:

  • Educating educators (including International Police Cert.)
  • Lifting the lid
  • More work needs to be done

Closing off with the Author’s for IB Schools + protecting children:

Larsson’s advice for IB World Schools

  • Research the resources available
  • Attend training
  • Invite experts into your communities

To protect children:

  • Listen to them
  • Support them
  • Believe them
  • Find an expert to immediately investigate – it can be damaging to a child to have them repeat a story over and over again to someone who isn’t trained to do the interview.