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Understanding your legal rights under the National Redress Scheme

This newsletter provides you with information about your legal options in regards to the National Redress Scheme (the Scheme).

For more information or to find support services, visit the http://nationalredress.gov.au/ or call 1800 737 377 Monday to Friday (local time) excluding public holidays.

Understanding your legal rights under the National Redress Scheme

You are not required to use a lawyer to apply for redress. However, you may wish to seek legal advice to understand if redress if the best option for you and the impact it may have on other legal rights.

If you want to access legal support, the Scheme offers free legal advice through knowmore or call 1800 605 762 (Free call).

You can also choose to use a private lawyer. This will be at your own cost. Below are some questions you may have regarding the use of lawyers and the Scheme. 

Frequently Asked Questions

 

Am I required to seek legal advice?

No. However, you may wish to seek legal advice as this may help you through the process and allow you to completely understand your legal rights.

Can I get free legal advice?

Yes. The Scheme provides free legal support services through ‘knowmore’.

What can knowmore provide?

knowmore is available for free to all people thinking about applying to the Scheme.

knowmore can provide you with:

  • legal support through the application process,
  • legal advice on your options, including the availability of other forms of action or redress aside from the Scheme,
  • assistance understanding the legal effects of accepting an offer of redress,
  • advice on the effect of confidentiality agreements in past proceedings,
  • take complaints about the Scheme,
  • support obtaining records,
  • linking with specialist counselling, support services and victims’ support groups, and
  • any other legal support needs, through providing information and referral support.

 

What is knowmore?

knowmore is a legal service funded by the Commonwealth Government through the Attorney-General’s Department.

knowmore delivers free services nationally from its three offices in Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney with regular visits to other States and Territories. These services are delivered through its multidisciplinary team of lawyers, social workers and counsellors.

knowmore has a proven track record of providing legal support services to survivors of child sexual abuse. It has the infrastructure and expertise deliver national, quality and trauma‑informed legal services.
 

Do I have to use knowmore?

No. You are not required to seek legal advice to apply to the Scheme. You can also use a private lawyer. This may be at your own cost.
 

Should I seek legal advice?

You may wish to seek legal advice, with the Scheme offering free advice through knowmore. While the Scheme is designed to be non-legalistic, some people may need help to complete their application to ensure that all the necessary information has been included. knowmore can help with this.

For many people making an application for redress will be the right thing to do. However, not everyone is eligible for redress. Some people may also want to consider if civil litigation is a better option for them.

If you have received redress under other schemes or through past actions or claims you can still apply to this Scheme; however, prior payments may be taken into account.

If you accept an offer of redress you must sign a release document. By signing this release, you will not be able to continue or to commence any civil or common law proceedings against the responsible institution or its officials. This is an important right to give up. knowmore can give you advice about the release and the legal options that you might have apart from redress.
 

Where do I get support?

Redress Support Services are available to help people understand the Scheme, provide emotional support and guide people through the application process. A list of support services is available on the website.

Those who need immediate emotional support can contact:
·         Beyond Blue 1300 224 636
·        
 Mensline 1300 78 99 78
·        
 Lifeline 13 11 14
·        
 1800 Respect 1800 737 732
·        
 Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467
·         In an emergency call Triple Zero (000)

 

Find out more

To find out more, you can call the National Redress Scheme on 1800 737 377Monday to Friday, 8am to 5pm (local time), excluding public holidays. You can also visit the website the National Redress Scheme website.


RETRIEVED eMail & https://mailchi.mp/4da97a10e5de/understanding-your-legal-rights-under-the-national-redress-scheme?e=5ccca9918d

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WA private school teacher to plead guilty to failing to report child sexual abuse charges

Tim Clarke The West Australian
Thursday, 9th May 2019 4:00 AM

Two former teachers have been charged with failing to report child sex abuse.


One of the private school teachers who became the first in WA to be charged with failing to report sexual abuse has revealed he will plead guilty to the charge, but he will not learn his punishment until the victim has had a chance to describe his pain. 

As revealed by The West Australian this week, two former teachers at a private boys’ schools were criminally charged with failing to report child sex abuse, following allegations a student was sexually assaulted by teammates during an overseas sports trip. 

The incident, in 2017, led to both teachers leaving the school and disciplinary measures against the students involved. 

But the school has never revealed exactly what the punishments were and no criminal charges were laid against the perpetrators. Instead, it was two of the teachers on the trip who were yesterday in court, charged under the WA laws that make it mandatory for them to report sexual abuse. 

Neither appeared in Perth Magistrate’s Court, but the lawyer for one of them, Michael Tudori, said his client wanted to plead guilty and get the matter dealt with.

But prosecutors stepped in and applied to have a victim impact statement from the boy who was bullied and sexually assaulted on the trip considered by the court. 

Magistrate Mark Millington, who told the court he was an old boy of the school involved, agreed. Mr Tudori said his client accepted that the non-reporting of the incident had caused the pupil “great distress”. 

“But it has also caused all sorts of distress to my client,” Mr Tudori said, including not being able to work as a teacher. 

One teacher will return to court later this month. 

The other, who is currently in the US, was ordered to return to court next month.


RETRIEVED https://thewest.com.au/news/court-justice/wa-private-school-teacher-to-plead-guilty-to-failing-to-report-child-sexual-abuse-charges-ng-b881191948z?utm_campaign=share-icons&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&tid=1557364664446

Jury discharged in trial of former Brisbane Boys College teacher charged with indecent treatment

May 9, 2019 1:10am Kay DibbenThe Courier-Mail

Former Brisbane Boys College teacher, Nicholas Lloyd (sunglasses) pictured leaving the District and Supreme Court, Brisbane. Picture: AAP Image/Josh Woning

THE JURY in the trial of a former Brisbane Boys College science teacher charged with indecent treatment of a male student more than 20 years ago has been discharged.

Brisbane District Court Judge Nicole Kefford made the decision after a juror was unable to attend court for the second and third days of the trial of Nicholas Frederick Lloyd.

Lloyd had pleaded not guilty to indecently dealing with a child under 16, who was in his care at Brisbane Boys College at Toowong in the 1990s.

Discharging the jury today, Judge Kefford told the jurors there was also an issue about witness availability.

Crown prosecutor Toby Corsbie had closed the Crown case on Tuesday, after the alleged victim, his mother, two former BBC students, a former principal and a police officer had given evidence.

The trial did not go ahead on Wednesday, the second day, because of a sick juror.

Judge Kefford adjourned the case until May 15, for discussion about a new trial date

RETRIEVED https://amp.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/crime-and-justice/jury-discharged-in-trial-of-former-brisbane-boys-college-teacher-charged-with-indecent-treatment/news-story/1e04caa9dc2eeb6a0e6383934b5dcd06

Former teacher facing indecent treatment trial

One of BBC’s previous Staff (Nick Lloyd) today began being confronted by Court Charges. The Courier Mail had published this Article, which we hope to re-publish ASAP. The dramatic boosts in our recent Visitors had indicated searches for “Nick Lloyd” & various other BBC Teachers. These Stats should be included in future eNews.

Sudden surge in Blog visitors!

While we are quietly confident at some reasons for the sudden jump to around 600 visitors, each & everyone of you are welcome to ask any questions, post any comments & piece together how you may want your location layer out.

We are planning an update to this site, in the near future. Your rapid visit, may be the motivation needed!

What Are Support Groups for Anxiety? (2/2)

IN THIS ARTICLE


What a Group is like

Finding the right Group

What to consider


How many people are in the group? A large gathering means you get to hear from more people. A small one can give you more time to work through your own feelings. A psychologist or another therapist can help you decide which size suits your needs.

Do all the members have anxiety? There are lots of different kinds of support groups. They often work best when most of the members have similar issues.

What are the rules for sharing in this group? A therapist won’t share anything you say to her. Group members aren’t supposed to, either. Ground rules about keeping what’s shared during therapy confidential can help the members build trust with each other.

What to Consider

One of the biggest advantages is that you’ll get support from other people who feel like you do. That can improve your mood and make you feel less alone.

Other people who have started to treat their anxiety may inspire you. You might pick up tips or techniques that help you deal with your own situation.

Helping problem-solve for your fellow group members can also remind you that you know a lot about managing anxiety. That can prompt you to use those skills in your own life. And group therapy is often less expensive than individual counseling.

There can be drawbacks, though. If one person doesn’t want to open up to the group, others may hesitate to share their thoughts. That can make sessions less effective.

While you may get helpful ideas from other members, don’t take their opinions and comments more seriously than the therapist who is leading the group.

If you have concerns about how your group is going, you may want to privately talk to the therapist who leads it to see if they can change how things are done. Or you may want to try another group or one-on-one therapy.

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari, MD on January 16, 2018

© 2018 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.

SOURCES

American Psychological Association: “Psychotherapy: Understanding Group Therapy.” 

Anxiety and Depression Association of America: “Support Groups.” 

Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience: “Cognitive behavioral group therapy for anxiety: recent developments.”

National Health Service (NHS) U.K.: “Depression Support Groups.”

BJPsych Advances: “Group cognitive-behavioural therapy for anxiety and depression.”

American Addiction Centers: “Group Therapy Vs. Individual Therapy.” 


RETRIEVED: The Benefits of Support Group Therapy

What Are Support Groups for Anxiety? (1/2)

IN THIS ARTICLE


What a Group is Like

Finding the Right Group

What to Consider


Anxiety can make you feel like you’re all alone in your fears. But many people live with this condition every day. Hearing from others who know what it’s like can make you feel less isolated and help you find new ways to deal with nervous feelings. Group therapy is one way to make those connections as part of your treatment.

What a Group Is Like

Group therapy usually includes five to 15 people with a common issue — in this case, anxiety — who meet, usually every week for an hour or so. Yours might be for people with all types of anxiety or for specific types, such as social phobia. Most groups are held in person in a space like a community center or hospital. Others meet online.

A trained therapist will lead the sessions. Your therapist will talk to you and the group and make suggestions about dealing with anxiety. You’ll also talk with other members of the group, who share their experiences and may make suggestions to each other. The goal is to learn about yourself and find new ways to ease your anxious feelings. You might improve your relationships with others, feel more connected, and be more satisfied with your life, too.

Groups that focus on anxiety often use cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). In CBT, a therapist helps you identify negative thoughts (including anxious ones) and replace them with healthier, more realistic ones. Some sessions may include outings or social events.

You may decide to see a therapist on your own and also go to a group, along with using other treatments for anxiety, such as medication.

Finding the Right Group

Before you join, it can help to ask the organizer or therapist running the group these questions:

Is this group open or closed? Can people join at any time, or does everyone begin together and meet for a set period of time (for example, 12 weeks)? Starting together as a closed group may help you get to know the members better, making for good, productive conversations. But with an open group, you can start therapy right away instead of waiting for the next open session.

1 of 2 (Cont.)

RETRIEVED https://www.webmd.com/anxiety-panic/guide/anxiety-support-group#1