The Undeniable Connection between DID and Child Abuse

APRIL 20, 2016 CRYSTALIE MATULEWICZ


HealthPlace.com

There is an undeniable link between dissociative identity disorder (DID) and child abuse. Child abuse can lead to mental health problems that occur in childhood and can continue into adulthood. People often relate childhood abuse to depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but dissociative identity disorder has the most significant connection to childhood abuse and neglect, so much so that the connection between DID and child abuse cannot be ignored.

What Is Child Abuse and Neglect, and Who Is at Risk?

Child abuse includes physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, and/or neglect that results in the harm of a child. In a large majority of child abuse cases, a parent is the abuser. It is also important to note that women perpetrate child abuse more frequently than men, a reality that goes against common societal belief.

Child abuse knows no boundaries. It occurs in rich families and in poor, in families of all religious backgrounds, and in all different races. There is no “type” of child that will be abused, just as there is no one “type” of abuser.

The Relationship between Child Abuse, Neglect and Dissociative Identity Disorder

According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Illness (DSM-5), a history of childhood abuse and neglect is prevalent in 90% of cases of dissociative identity disorder (DID). The remaining cases involve medical trauma, terrorism, and childhood prostitution. Ninety percent is overwhelming. Other research claims that rates of abuse and neglect in DID are actually much higher.

DID develops in response to severe, recurring trauma in childhood. Children are not fully equipped to cope with continued, severe instances of abuse, so they may develop dissociation as a survival skill, which can then develop into DID. It makes sense, then, that the rate of childhood abuse and neglect in people with DID is so high.

Preventing Child Abuse Can Prevent Dissociative Identity Disorder

There’s no telling how much of those 90% of DID cases could have been prevented had those children been protected from abuse. If we prevent child abuse, we can greatly reduce the number of cases of DID, and cases of other disorders with roots in childhood trauma.

Awareness and prevention is a universal effort. Mental health workers, teachers, and other professionals working with children need to be aware of the signs of abuse and neglect. We, as a society, need to educate our children about abuse and body safety and eliminate the shame abuse causes.

Most importantly, never deny a child or adult who says they have been abused. Most of the time, abusers are also very good actors, playing the part society wants to see on the outside, and changing their roles into abusers behind closed doors. During one of my psychiatric hospitalizations, I overheard a mental health aide say, “She said her mom abused her, but I don’t know; her mom seemed really nice and caring on the phone.”

That feeling of being invalidated hurts in a way that cannot be erased.

So many times in my life, people turned a blind eye to the abuse. As a child, I showed many of the classic signs of abuse, but those signs were ignored or rationalized by people on the outside. Here was a family that went to church every Sunday, sent their children to private school, and seemed put-together in public. Abuse doesn’t happen in families like that. Except it does. It happened to me; and it happens to countless others.

I’m managing my DID, but I wouldn’t wish it on anyone. I don’t want future generations to have to go through the same turmoil that I went through. Child abuse is preventable. DID can be, too.

Find Crystalie on Google+FacebookTwitterher website and her blog.Tags: child abuse and DIDchild abuse and dissociative identity disorderDID and child abusedissociative identity disorder and child abuse

APA Reference
Matulewicz, C. (2016, April 20). The Undeniable Connection between DID and Child Abuse, HealthyPlace. Retrieved on 2020, July 30 from https://www.healthyplace.com/blogs/dissociativeliving/2016/04/the-undeniable-connection-between-did-and-child-abuse

Author: Crystalie Matulewicz

Crystalie is the founder of PAFPAC, is a published author and the writer of Life Without Hurt. She has a BA in psychology and will soon have an MS in Experimental Psychology, with a focus on trauma. Crystalie manages life with PTSD, DID, major depression, and an eating disorder. You can find Crystalie on Facebook, Google+, and Twitter.

RETRIEVED see APA Reference (above Author)

Uncertainty of public discussions

As a result of various threats, warnings & suggestions – any conversations from any of these public RCbbc Blog posts must be kept private. Following recent advice I’ve personally been given, discussions had with Bob Atkinson, other RC staff & relevant experts in the trade – parts of the previous public posts/messages may have to be removed. These same topics will then be continued privately, which I hope will allow the growing awareness to continue.

In a diplomatic use of often external, yet slightly-related media, it’s been hoped that through these uses reminders, parallels

  • Reminders,
  • Parallels,
  • Suggestions,
  • Similes,
  • Other extra topics …

May be influenced in our SHARED RCbbc Support Group. While we’ve never intended to show vengeance, or disregard, or damages to the BBC Institution – these may be a common result for numerous Victim-Survivours, Family’s, Friends, and others in their related communities. All that our RCbbc can do is suggest that your choice of National and State Support Services be contacted!

Finding help &  support
Contact & support | Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse

NRS – Submission Update

To each of our RCbbc Blog Readers who have-are-will submit an NRS Submission, it pleases me that I’m reaching a point in my Submission Drafting that my Counsellor & I will soon send it off to another agency. This may sound complex, yet it’s what a fair amount of the CSA Surviving-Victims require.

Although I had earlier been in contact with some of these same offices previously, I was approaching things in the wrong order. I now understand why some avenues suggest a ‘top down’ mentality, yet for the rest of us we’re happier with a ‘grassroots’ approach.

Grassroots VS Top-down

Help out, by helping others

Whenever you may have felt a need to pay something back, here’s a Future-focussed way you can. After interest in earning my own ‘#cryptocurrencies’, I learnt about online wallets. This is where news that ‘Binance Exchange bought TrustWallet’, can start to grab the interest of those outside some of those ‘Elite Circles’ …

Coindo.com article

Each of us can receive 10%. Binance is making waves. https://binance.com/en/register?ref=F9FNH4BM…#binance#cryptocoin Take a look at how cryptocurrencies and blockchain are reshaping our world from Bloomberg @business @crypto

binance

Greater Awareness

‘With greater awareness, comes preparedness’. Just as more attention is being shown to the long-hidden patterns of Child-Sexual-Abuse (CSA) in various Institutions, the deeper + wider impacts of ‘Multi-layered Corruption’ throughout wider social layers are beginning to be revealed…

‘Prepare Yourself’ : http://blog.buraga.org/

As Qld’s Private Schooling (e.g. GPS) are awaiting for collective, group actions similar to individual churches/schools/teachers – evidence is only mounting. Hopes are to strive for some of the Research, collected with Public Statements, Journalism (draft + published) and other related Info. I am aware of other ‘Group Actions’, yet am unsure of the feasibility of ‘collective (?)’ action. Similar actions have been successful, in communities (I.E. ‘Residents VS Council’) which various CSA Victims and Surviving Family-Friends believe they are. While some institution communities, now distance themselves from past occasions – the damages of previous CSA Impacts does not have the same ‘Use By Date’. Indeed, as per the following ‘can of worms’ image, and as proven by the growing audience of this ‘RoyalCommBBC.blog’ – many others are in need of Support, Direction and Comforting.

As focussed in the following image, are seven (7) of the GPS Qld Schools and Colleges. Alike the classic story of ‘Sisyphus pushing a stone up a hill’, the multiple examples of lifelong impacts of CSA need to be dealt with: IGS, BGS, SJGT, SJNC, TSS, BBC & ACGS. Please add your thoughts…

GPS Schools + Colleges – https://gpsqld.org.au/member-schools/

The National Redress Scheme – Newsletter


This newsletter covers arrangements for the second anniversary review of the National Redress Scheme (the Scheme).

Should you find any of the content in this newsletter confronting or distressing, remember support is available. To find out more, go to www.nationalredress.gov.au/support.

Second anniversary review

The Scheme was established on 1 July 2018. Following its second anniversary, an independent review is being conducted to consider how the Scheme is working for survivors and other stakeholders.The review is wide-ranging and will consider the implementation and operation of the Scheme, how survivors experience the Scheme, access to Redress Support Services and to counselling and psychological care as well as financial arrangements.

An independent reviewer, Ms Robyn Kruk AO, is undertaking the review. Ms Kruk was the Independent Assessor of the Defence Abuse Response Taskforce and is currently the Chair of Mental Health Australia. In 2018, Ms Kruk was appointed as an Officer of the Order of Australia for distinguished service to public administration, including mental health reform.

The review is undertaking consultations from July 2020 until September 2020.

To help us improve the Scheme, we encourage survivors, advocates and other stakeholders to have their say in the review. It is critical that survivors are at the centre of the review and that the review captures what matters to them most.

You can provide feedback by making a submission and/or participating in a feedback study with pre-prepared questions. Information about how you can make a submission is available on the Scheme website: www.nationalredress.gov.au/about/second-anniversary-review.  

The feedback study will open from August 2020 and we will provide further information about this on the Scheme website and an upcoming newsletter when available.

Find out more

To find out more about the Scheme, go to www.nationalredress.gov.au or call 1800 737 377 from Australia or +61 3 6222 3455 from overseas and leave a message.
If you need immediate support, 24-hour telephone assistance is available through:


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RETRIEVED via eMail RCVD 3:42pm 20.07.20

10 Warning Signs Of Gaslighting To Never Ignore

It can be very disorienting to feel like you have done something, but you haven’t. It’s also disorienting to be someone who tries to be a nice person, but is constantly accused of being disingenuous. If you’re experiencing either of these feelings as a result of another person’s actions, it’s possible that you might be a victim of gaslighting.

Though many people have been introduced to the term gaslighting recently, it’s important to understand exactly where it came from. The term has a long and varied history in the public eye, but it mainly takes its name from the 1944 film Gaslight, in which a woman (Paula, portrayed by Ingrid Bergman) is psychologically manipulated by her husband to feel like she is insane when in reality she is perfectly fine.

Despite the fact that her mental state is perfectly fine, she still believes that she is going mad, a worry that gives her intense discomfort and produces legitimate feelings of madness.

It’s important to note that Paula eventually gets out of the relationship after realizing what is happening to her and learns to deal with manipulation, but the situation set a useful precedent for talking about psychological manipulation as it happens in society. Because of this, the term “gaslighting” reference’s the movie’s title as a way of describing the specific method of manipulation.

It might seem easy to understand manipulation as something that simply happened in a movie, but it can occur quite frequently in society. The most damaging thing about the practice is that many people who suffer from it don’t actually know that they’re being gaslit. Instead, they mistake their confusion for legitimate feelings against themselves, leading to lowered self worth and possible situations that make it more difficult to deal with gaslighting, such as Paula’s position in the aforementioned film.

This is why manipulation is important to understand and fight against when you notice that it is happening to you or somebody you know. More often than not, gaslighting occurs between two individuals who trust each other, with one subtly manipulating the other. Because it occurs often within intimate interpersonal relationships, manipulation can be incredibly difficult to spot.

Like with many other conditions, failing to notice manipulation early on can result in the condition getting worse, the victim becoming even more unaware, and potentially more damage in the long run.

To prepare yourself to deal with gaslighting before it’s too late, it’s essential to familiarize yourself with its symptoms. This is why we’re here to help—in this article, we’ll be taking a look at 10 Warning Signs of Gaslighting to Never Ignore.

Before we get into this article, we want to say that if you think that you might be experiencing symptoms of manipulation, it is important to get professional help from a psychologist or therapist. Medical professionals are the people who truly understand manipulation and how to deal with gaslighting, so please be careful and get help if you notice any of these 10 symptoms happening in your life.

#10. It’s Not All Negative

It’s easy to think that abuse and emotional manipulation is simply constant negativity and nothing else. However, abusers often mix in positive comments and what looks like love to make a victim believe that they actually do care about them. This type of hot/cold treatment is a cornerstone symptom of abuse.

Regardless of how it happens, it’s worth noting that positivity does not negate emotionally manipulative behavior and cannot be justified as love no matter how brief the negative behavior was.

#9. They Project Their Emotions

Many abusers often project their own problems onto their victims. For instance, if an abuser is having trouble managing money, they might criticize their partner’s financial situation more harshly than their own as a way of getting their partner to doubt their sense of reality.

#8. Confusion is Their Priority

Many abusers will start to gaslight victims by making them feel as though they are perpetually confused. It’s important to see these symptoms as they occur so you don’t fall prey to emotional abuse.

#7. They Get Others to Doubt You

Sometimes an abuser can manipulate the relationship a victim has to others by getting them to also be complicit in manipulating the victim. This is often without the others even knowing, getting them to admit to small personality traits and then blowing it up in the face of the victim.

For example, if an abuser wants a victim to think that they over-exaggerate everything, they might get a close mutual friend to admit that the victim blew one situation out of proportion. After this, they’ll present the findings to the victim in order to make them think they do blow things out of proportion.

#6. They Target Friends

A lot of the time, many people who are victims of gaslighting don’t realize it because they don’t have much contact with others who might be able to see the symptoms. This is often because the abuser makes the victim feel like they can’t trust their friends, resulting in them not socializing as much as they once did.

This can also be done by making their friends seem inauthentic or like liars themselves, causing the victim to believe the abuser and willingly limit their contact.

#5. Using Their Emotions

It’s no secret that being in a relationship involves both partners being able to listen to the other’s needs. However, abusers will often manipulate this relationship dynamic to make the other person do things they don’t want to do without evidence. Similar to what was previously mentioned regarding targeting friends and making the victim feel uncomfortable around those they used to socialize with, abusers can also cite their own personal feelings without providing evidence for something.

For example, if an abuser refuses to let their partner go see a friend on the basis that they hate them (or other aggressively negative feelings) without having any actual anecdotal evidence, that can be a form of gaslighting.

#4. Lying as a Precedent

When people lie, sometimes we have to think a bit to actually see through it clearly. This is why when somebody lies so blatantly, we take notice. Abusers manipulating victims will often take advantage of this dynamic, spewing blatant lies as a means of setting up a precedent.

By lying so directly, they will make the victim assume that everything they say from that point onward is a lie, something that makes manipulation a normal routine.

#3. Denying the Victim Agency

When we think of abusive behavior in relationships, we typically assume that it is something drastic, such as an abuser literally locking somebody into their apartment so they can’t go outside. However, there are more subtle ways this can occur through manipulation without the victim even noticing it, sometimes even being willingly complicit.

For example, if you’re in a relationship with somebody who continually questions your ability to not flirt with others while alone, they might be able to pressure you into feeling guilty for going outside or feeling that you can’t socialize without them by your side.

#2. Repetitive Nature of Symptoms

Many people falsely assume that they will be able to spot manipulation as soon as it begins happening, allowing them to quickly put a stop to the behavior. However, this couldn’t be further from the truth—gaslighting typically occurs over long periods of time, with the abuser slowly introducing more and more tactics into the victim’s everyday life until it has gotten too far to recognize it cleanly.

This is why it’s important to not take certain denials of agency lightly. If somebody is doing a similar action to deny your agency multiple times over, it could be an effect of how manipulation is now entering your relationship.

#1. Deny Something They Said

One of the most distressing symptoms of gaslighting is that the abuser might directly deny something they surely said previously. This is especially insidious as it pushes the victim to start to question their sense of reality.

When somebody says something didn’t happen that surely did happen, what does that mean for the rest of reality? Is it possible to even have an objective sense of reality when someone is lying so blatantly? This is why manipulation is such a harmful form of manipulation, as it can really get into somebody’s head and make them begin to question their entire life.

A way to prevent this can be to create objective proof of certain conversations so when they’re brought up again, you’re able to be sure that the abuser is definitely manipulating you.

Final Thoughts on Gaslighting

Gaslighting is an incredibly harmful form of emotional manipulation that is important to be aware of. By learning how to deal with gaslighting effectively, you can help yourself or your friends to catch the symptoms before it’s too late.

If you’ve noticed that you or somebody you know is experiencing symptoms of gaslighting, read the tips to this article and understand that speaking with a medical professional is the best way to deal with gaslighting!


RETRIEVED https://www.powerofpositivity.com/10-warning-signs-of-gaslighting/

20 ‘powerful elite’ abused children for decades – whistleblower

8 Jul, 2014 10:52 / Updated 6 years ago

Britain’s Home Secretary Theresa May (Reuters / Phil Noble) © Reuters

At least 20 former MPs, government ministers, judges and other prominent figures abused children for decades, claims a former child protection manager.

At least 20 former MPs, government ministers, judges and other prominent figures abused children for decades, claims a former child protection manager.

Whistleblower Peter McKelvie, whose allegations led initially to a 2012 police inquiry, told BBC Newsnight a “powerful elite” of pedophiles carried out “the worst form” of abuse.

He told the programme there was evidence that victims of abuse were treated like “lumps of meat,” taken from place to place to be molested.

McKelvie, formerly a child protection manager in Hereford and Worcester, took his concerns to Labour MP Tom Watson in 2012, who then raised the matter in parliament, prompting a preliminary police inquiry that became a formal inquiry in 2013.

“For the last 30 years and longer than that, there have been a number of allegations made by survivors that people at the very top of powerful institutions in this country … have been involved in the abuse of children,”McKelvie told Newsnight.

Asked if claims had been made against people still in positions of power today, he said, “Very much so … what are allegations may or may not be true, but the allegations are there and they are against very specific named individuals.”

Announcing two reviews into the claims in the House of Commons on Monday, Home Secretary Theresa May said the first would be led by an independent panel of experts headed by Lady Butler Slosson law and child protection, while the second would cover how police and prosecutors handled information given to them.

She said further inquiries would focus on the Home Office’s alleged failure to act on allegations of child sex abuse contained in a dossier handed to them by Home Secretary Leon Britton in the 1980s by former Tory MP Geoffrey Dickens.

May claimed that files in the missing dossier were not deleted or destroyed intentionally, but pledged the inquiries would determine whether state bodies and “other non-state institutions”fulfilled their“duty of care to protect children from sexual abuse.

“It will, like the inquiries into Hillsborough and the murder of Daniel Morgan, be a non-statutory panel inquiry. This means that it can begin its work sooner,” she told MPs.


RETRIEVED https://www.rt.com/uk/171176-children-abuse-mps-decades/

Emotional Support and Adult Depression in Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse

Katherine L. Muslinera and Jonathan B. Singer

KEYWORDS: childhood sexual abuse; emotional support; depression; parents; friends


Opening its Abstract with “The goals of this study were to evaluate the effects of emotional support from friends and parents at two time points (adolescence and adulthood) on adult depression in a nationally representative sample of survivors of childhood sexual abuse (CSA), and examine whether the associations were moderated by the identity of the perpetrator (parent/caregiver vs. not).” (Abstract 2012 p1)

Emotional Support and CSA

The Role of the Timing of Support – Does it Matter When?

Current study

Method | Data, Measures, Data Analysis

Results | Descriptive Statistics, Effects of Emotional Support on Adult Depression, Moderation by Perpetrator Identity (see NOTE)

NOTE: “There was, however, a statistically significant interaction between parental support in adulthood and perpetrator identity (p = .02). As shown in Table 4, among survivors of non-parent/caregiver abuse, high support from parents in adulthood reduced the odds of depression by 67% (p < .0001), and high support from friends in adulthood reduced the odds of depression by 42% (p = .02). Among survivors of parent/caregiver abuse, none of the emotional support variables were significantly associated with adult depression.”

Moderation by Gender | Discussion, Limitations, Conclusions

Acknowledgments | Footnotes | References


There was a significant change in Victims-Survivours + when they reached Adulthood, after non-parent/caregiver abuse. You can still get Counselling, without ‘Reporting an Incident’. These can give Surviving Victims of CSA greater confidence + strength in their lives. (see Results, Moderation by Perpetrator Identity (see NOTE above)


RETRIEVED https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4383236/

Ghislaine Maxwell is secretly married, refuses to reveal spouse’s name

By Jackie Salo and Lia Eustachewich July 15, 2020 | 7:51am |

A courtroom sketch of Ghislaine Maxwell during her arraignment hearing. REUTERS/Jane Rosenberg

Ghislaine Maxwell is secretly married — and refusing to reveal her husband’s name, prosecutors said this week at the accused madame’s bail hearing.

The bombshell detail was divulged Tuesday as Manhattan prosecutors accused her of purposely hiding the extent of her wealth.

“In addition to failing to describe in any way the absence of proposed cosigners of a bond, the defendant also makes no mention whatsoever about the financial circumstances or assets of her spouse whose identity she declined to provide to Pretrial Services,” Assistant US Attorney Alison Moe told Manhattan federal court Judge Alison Nathan during a video conference.

Moe added, “There’s no information about who will be co-signing this bond or their assets, and no details whatsoever.”

Maxwell’s lawyers asked for her to be sprung on a $5 million bond.

Prosecutors convinced the judge that Maxwell poses an “extreme” flight risk if let out on bail, claiming she used a fake identity to purchase her sprawling New Hampshire hideout, lied about her overall wealth and spent the last year in hiding from authorities.


Ghislaine Maxwell FilmMagic

Nathan refused to set bail for the British socialite, shipping her back to the Metropolitan Detention Center pending her trial, which was set for next July.

Maxwell was busted July 2 on a six-count indictment charging her with recruiting and grooming young women to be sexually abused by both her and Jeffrey Epstein, her one-time lover.

FILED UNDER GHISLAINE MAXWELL , JEFFREY EPSTEIN , MANHATTAN FEDERAL COURT , MARRIAGE , SEXUAL ABUSE , 7/15/20

Jeffrey Epstein and Ghislaine MaxwellPatrick McMullan via Getty Images

RETRIEVED https://nypost.com/2020/07/15/ghislaine-maxwell-is-secretly-married-prosecutors-say/?utm_campaign=partnerfeed&utm_medium=syndicated&utm_source=flipboard